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  1. #21

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    If these really do date to the period that you believe then the negative emulsion was most probably orthochromatic.

    In my experience, there is no way to filter a panchromatic film and have it behave as an orthochromatic film.

  2. #22
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grunthos
    I second that. As soon as I saw the photos, I figured that it had to be a blue sensitive or color blind film. The black tulips were the giveaway here. I've been considering doing a series of portraits with a blue filter over the lens to see if it is possible to get that vintage look with modern films. This could be interesting.

    Grunthos
    The filter most often recommended to mimic orthochromatic results with panchromatic films is the Wratten #44, a cyan filter. Obviously this won't be a perfect emulation, and there are obviously different spectral responses among orthochromatic films, but it's a starting point to try and find something you like. The B+W 470 is such a filter. You could also try some of the ortho films currently being made.

    Lee

  3. #23

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    I remember seeing a show of his work at the Chicago Botantic Garden. A similar digital show was going on next door and his was just so much better. But I'm not sure of any technical details or even if they were original prints. You might try to call the Garden, 847-835-8215. You might get lucky and find someone who knows. www.chicagobotanic.org

  4. #24
    titrisol's Avatar
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    I went to the library to look for the book, and found it.
    The prints are gorgeous, very well made and reproduced. So i'll speculate about them:
    - The [ictures are gorgeous, very good use of light
    - They were made in glass negatives and most probably contact printed
    - The papers Mr Jones used were either hand made or old-style papers
    - He goldtoned his photos (it says in the book)
    - The reproduction is excellent, but I wonder how much of that "efffect" comes from a savvy use of inks?



    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    If these really do date to the period that you believe then the negative emulsion was most probably orthochromatic.

    In my experience, there is no way to filter a panchromatic film and have it behave as an orthochromatic film.
    But there is.... using a cyan filter (cuts down the red)
    Mama took my APX away.....

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by titrisol
    I went to the library to look for the book, and found it.
    The prints are gorgeous, very well made and reproduced. So i'll speculate about them:
    - The [ictures are gorgeous, very good use of light
    - They were made in glass negatives and most probably contact printed
    - The papers Mr Jones used were either hand made or old-style papers
    - He goldtoned his photos (it says in the book)
    - The reproduction is excellent, but I wonder how much of that "efffect" comes from a savvy use of inks?




    But there is.... using a cyan filter (cuts down the red)
    Using a cyan or blue filter on a panchromatic film is not the same as using a orthochromatic film...it may depart from a truly panchormatic rendering but it does not alter the inherent panchromatic emulsion characteristics to the point that it in anyway approaches a truly orthochromatic spectral response.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    In my experience, there is no way to filter a panchromatic film and have it behave as an orthochromatic film.

    this is true, but one could always use a paper negative ...

  7. #27
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Easier still - use Maco Ortho film...

    Bob.

  8. #28

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    If there are any ortho films still being made (does Kodak still make Tri-X Ortho in large sizes?), the way to mimick color blind film is to use the #44 over the Ortho. Orthochromatic was an "improvement" over color blind film, in that it allowed for some green light, I believe. Hence the "ortho", meaning "correct". Panchromatic went the whole spectrum with red sensitivity added. Anyway, I simply recall A.A. suggesting the use of a blue filter with ortho film to simulate the really old emulsions of around the late 19th cent. I really don't think you can get that with any filtration over panchromatic films.
    Robert Hunt

  9. #29
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Would the Ilford Ortho be comparible, do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F.
    Easier still - use Maco Ortho film...

    Bob.

  10. #30
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bosaiya
    Would the Ilford Ortho be comparible, do you think?
    Probably, but I think it is only available in sheet sizes. The Maco is available in 35mm and 120 as well. Never tried either myself I hasten to add - I like red

    Bob.

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