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  1. #1
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    How did Charles Jones get such silver blacks?

    I've been in awe of the work of Charles Jones for some time now after stumbling upon Plant Kingdoms at my local library. His blacks are so rich that they look like tarnished silver.

    If you haven't seen his work, there is a good representation here: http://www.nielsengallery.com/db/Cha...nes/e0504.html

    and specifically here: http://www.nielsengallery.com/db/Cha...s/longpod.html

    His process is described as "gold-toned silver gelatin" and I know he worked on glass plates. Is anyone doing any work like his these days? I've looked around online and met with no good results. I've seen other people doing gold-toned silver gelatin but it never looked like his.

    How would one go about reproducing the effect these days? Any good tips?

  2. #2

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    The Web images don't look that special to me. The tonality and printing is excellent, but anyone with a MF camera and patience could do the same with standard materials.

  3. #3
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    doesn't look extremely special to me, maybe the GOLD TONING is the key here

  4. #4
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    The web images are just that: web images. You're right, they don't look terribly special, but without a good way to pass the book around I'm not sure of a better method. I figured someone might have seen the book or one of the prints.

    If it makes any difference the photos were made in the late 1800s.
    Last edited by Bosaiya; 05-25-2005 at 03:18 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added date info

  5. #5

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    Are they platinum prints?

    David.

  6. #6

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    I think someone in the gallery made a mistake in the description, these look to me more like albumen prints than "silver gelatine." I might be wrong but I thought silver gelatine paper was not invented until the early to mid 1900s.Gold toning of Albumen, kallitypes, salt prints most times produces a bluish black tone that might be what you are looking for.

  7. #7
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Not that I'm aware of.

    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft
    Are they platinum prints?

    David.

  8. #8
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    The info comes from book, which is probably where the website got it from. I'm not aware of the historical timeline of the processes, but there wasn't any hesitation on the part of the author in describing them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    I think someone in the gallery made a mistake in the description, these look to me more like albumen prints than "silver gelatine." I might be wrong but I thought silver gelatine paper was not invented until the early to mid 1900s.Gold toning of Albumen, kallitypes, salt prints most times produces a bluish black tone that might be what you are looking for.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    I think someone in the gallery made a mistake in the description, these look to me more like albumen prints than "silver gelatine." I might be wrong but I thought silver gelatine paper was not invented until the early to mid 1900s.Gold toning of Albumen, kallitypes, salt prints most times produces a bluish black tone that might be what you are looking for.
    I thought silver gelatin papers, even ones sensitive enough to be enlarged by gaslight, where common commercial products in the late 1800s.

  10. #10

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    Another idea: if the prints are really old, the shadow areas could be getting a silvery sheen because of sulfide attack. I guess it's regarded as a defect, but it can look really interesting. This shouldn't be happening if it's really gold-toned, though.

    Maybe one of the chemistry wizzes here can tell us if there's a way to acheive this purposely. Halochrome toner is supposed to do this with the entire image - perhaps it doesn't have to be used to completion?

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