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Thread: Paper surfaces

  1. #1
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Paper surfaces

    I was just going through some of my prints from several years ago. I don't know what paper it is, but in that era it would either be Seagull VC or Kodak Polycontrast Fiber circa the late Eighties. I immediately noticed the difference in the F surface from the Polymax Fiber that I have been using for the last couple of years. I've always liked the gorgeous "brushed paper" texture of Polymax Fine Art F surface but examining these prints really makes it stand out by comparison. Even dry mounted and under glass it adds a dimension to the print. I'm getting ready to finish off the last of my Polymax FA single weight and start my first box of double weight (Thanks, Kodak ). I hope that it has same wonderful texture.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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    AAAAhhhhhhhhhhhh... CRAP!!

    I tried the Doubleweight tonight and it doesn't have that great Singleweight texture.

    THANKS A HEAP, KODAK!

    Well, At least I have about fifty sheets of SW left.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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    Seems like you need to get out the brush and paint some liquid emulsion on some heavy weight paper! Good luck!

    Wolfram
    Colour? We can always use an airbrush later...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Kollig
    Seems like you need to get out the brush and paint some liquid emulsion on some heavy weight paper! Good luck!

    Wolfram
    Well, I live in Rockland County New York. Just a few miles from Rockland Colloid, makers of Liquid Light but I've never gotten around to trying it.

    Does anyone remember an extra thin, thinner than single weight, Paper that Kodak used to make? Its name escapes me but as I remember, that paper used to have that thin F surface that allowed the paper texture to come through.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    Well, I live in Rockland County New York. Just a few miles from Rockland Colloid, makers of Liquid Light but I've never gotten around to trying it.

    Does anyone remember an extra thin, thinner than single weight, Paper that Kodak used to make? Its name escapes me but as I remember, that paper used to have that thin F surface that allowed the paper texture to come through.
    Scanning throught my collection of ancient Kodak Handbooks there are a couple of papers that fit your description. Kodak AD-type A is really lightweight and has very slight almost invisible texture, Kodak Portrait Proof is another. Kodak Opal type K, beautiful paper but my sample pack does not show a lightweight version. Another wonderful paper was Athena Type B and of course Ektalure. Any of these ring a bell?

    Mike

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    I think that this paper was specifically intended for document pages that contained illustrations, often printed from Copy Film negs. The thin paper blended into a stack of text pages that were on regular typewriter (Remember those?) paper. Now there's a task that is much easier and better today thnks to digital technology.
    Its not important, I just can't remember the darned name.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I think that this paper was specifically intended for document pages that contained illustrations, often printed from Copy Film negs. The thin paper blended into a stack of text pages that were on regular typewriter (Remember those?) paper. Now there's a task that is much easier and better today thnks to digital technology.
    Its not important, I just can't remember the darned name.
    Could you be thinking of the AD type paper? It is thin/lightweight and can be folded without cracking? Get this it came in 6 grades

    The other mentioned in my catalog (no sample though) is Kodagraph Contact Paper used for copying documents, not really designed as pictorial paper.

    Mike

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    The name doesn't ring a bell but that sounds _exactly_ like what I am thinking of. I am sure that is it. Thanks.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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    It just gets worse and worse.
    One of the amazing attributes of Polymax Single Weight was its utter lack of a Dry Down effect. I'm looking at the dried prints that I made last night on Double Weight and they are NFG. At least 15% too dark. Looks like after two years, I'm going to have to start dealing with compensation again.
    Thanks, Kodak
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=



 

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