Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,749   Posts: 1,483,786   Online: 873
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    13

    Enlarged contact sheets

    When I shoot 120 film, I have contact sheets made on 8.5x11" paper. The frames are in most cases large enough to be "readable". However, I find that it is a different story with 35mm negatives. The frames on the standard contact sheets are usually too small for me to make an accurate assessment of the negative. Unfortunately, making 4x6" proof prints of all frames is both costly and a waste of materials. I recently heard about "enlarged contact sheets" (either 11x14 or 16x20). I wonder how many of you resort to such enlarged contact sheets. Do you find that these offer any significant advantage over standard sized contacts? Lastly, how do you store these larger sheets? Thanks very much.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Minnesota Tropics
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    735
    Enlarged contacts are unnecessary. Put a loupe right on the negative.

  3. #3
    Bill Mobbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    156
    I use the loupe too. My eyes are not that good anymore. I use the loupe on 6X6 negs as well. I use a small hand held microscope at times.
    "Nobody is perfect! But even among those that are perfect, some are more perfect than others." Walt Sewell 1947

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    187
    Images
    7
    I used to make tons of these for a wedding photographer. The advantage was that the images were big enough to view without a loupe, but small enough that they could not be scanned and copied. I think I fit 3 strips of 4 images on an 8x10. - Jim

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    I've thought about doing this from time to time and never really came up with a satisfactory answer. To get an "enlarged" contact sheet means that, well, you will have to enlarge the negatives. That means you need to find a way to get strips of 35mm negatives lined up in an oversize carrier and project the image onto a 16x20 sheet of paper. It takes at least an 8x10 negative carrier to fit a full 36 exposure roll of 35mm film for such a task and then all you wind up with is a 2x enlargement of each negative. You could, of course, work with smaller and fewer strips in a 4x5 carrier and enlarge each set onto an 8x10 sheet of paper and you still end up with only a 2x enlargement. It goes without saying that this is only marginally practical if you have a glass carrier. Without a glass carrier you will be spilling negatives all over the place and will quickly become frustrated with the idea. As we say around here, fugetaboutit!

    The most economical way to make a contact sheet is to carefully line up your negatives on an 8x10 (a tight squeeze but do-able, and most economical) or 8 1/2 x11 (plenty of room, but slightly more expensive) sheet of paper. Then use a magnifying glass on the prints. A 2x magnifier is cheap.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,042
    As I soup my own negs and print them I've always thought of contact sheets as a waste of processing time be it 35mm or 120 film. My vote is for using a decent loupe with the negs either on a light box or against the window using natural light. Looking at the negs I get an idea of what I want to print and how to print it.

  7. #7
    kwmullet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Denton, TX, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    889
    Images
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by jjstafford
    Enlarged contacts are unnecessary. Put a loupe right on the negative.

    Not the best alternative for customers, and if you're
    wanting to keep costs down on jobs that have many rolls of
    film, enlarged contacts could be an attractive alternative
    to a huge stack of 4x6 machine prints. Also, if your
    customer has the enlarged contacts from which to evaluate
    the work, chances are they might order more enlargements
    than if they could "make do" with the 4x6 prints.

    Even if customers aren't part of the equation, I'd sure be
    a lot happier leafing through years of enlarged contacts
    than manhandling my sheets of negs, even in photofiles
    (or however you spell it) unnecessarily. Contact prints
    still convey a lot more information about an image than
    a scan, and are likely to last a heck of a lot longer, too.

    -KwM-

    <edit a few minutes later...>

    Having said the above, I looked over the course of a few
    months a while back for somewhere to give me enlarged
    contacts, and the one lab in town that USED to do it now
    scans the engs and gives 35mm-sized photoshop "contact
    sheets" instead. If you ask for a larger print, they
    just increase the whitespace between the 35mm-size frame.
    IMO, a complete waste of time and money and of MUCH lower
    quality than analog enlarged contacts. Basically, I'd
    need to find someone with a 10x10 enlarger and the time
    and inclination to do the work.

    Maybe someday in the distant future, someone could build a
    single-purpose, fixed-focus contraption that had an
    upside-down 8.5x11 or slightly larger contract printing
    frame, a light source above it (or a strobe?),
    a difusing box below it, a lens and a box with a paper carrier
    into which you could slide an 11x14 or 16x20 piece of
    paper and produce an enlarged contact sheet.

    -KwM-
    Last edited by kwmullet; 06-04-2005 at 10:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    geraldatwork's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Hicksville, NY
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    414
    Images
    24
    I have a film scanner. The Minolta Dimage III. While not the highest level scanner it is good to evaluate the negatives. It even gives me an idea of what has to be dodged and burned before I make my first work print.
    "When elephants fight it is the grass that suffers"
    African proverb

    IRAQNAM is Bush's legacy

  9. #9
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,081
    Images
    20
    This is usually done with an 8x10" enlarger and a glass carrier. Some people like them to impress clients, if the client can afford such things and it's a sufficiently high priced job.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #10
    rbarker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,222
    Images
    2
    Another option is to use a scanner capable of scanning 8x10 negs. Put your 35mm or 120 film in your PrintFile page, and scan the whole page at the input DPI needed to print whatever size "contact" sheet you need. I use my old Epson Expression 800 Pro for this, and it turns out to be quite handy. Not the same as putting a good loupe to the negative on a light box, but useful for general reference.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin