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  1. #11

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    Seems that I found something like D-76

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by reinis
    Can I find any recipes for the D 76 or Xtol on the net?
    Or are they secret?
    Haven't spent too much time on searching, but if noone tells me, I'll try to search on my own
    I'm asking, becaus getting any chemistry here, in Latvia isn't that simple.
    There are simply NO photoshops here. Just places You can go and order, and then wait or get to know that what You need is not avaliable NOW etc..
    So, if I knew any recipes, I could get the ingredients and try to get little quantity for some films.
    Steve Anchells Darkroom Cookbook has more than enough information for you if you can find a way to order a copy. Theres also been numerous threads in the forums for different variations of developers as well as a whole section in the Apug headers for Chemistry Recipes. The simplest recipe by far is D-23, a compensating type deveoper consisiting of 100g sodium sulfite and 7.5g metol in a liter of water. Let us know how you fare.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by reinis
    Can I find any recipes for the D 76 or Xtol on the net?
    You can find recipes for D-76 and several D-76 variants with a Google search.

    Xtol is a Kodak proprietary (secret) formulation whose developing agents are ascorbic acid (or an ascorbate) and a phenidone derivative.

    There are a lot of threads on Apug that discuss ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) developers.

    Perform an Apug search on PC-Tea (Pat Gainer's recipe). Mytol is another one, also Vitamin C and/or ascorbic acid.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  4. #14

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    Dear Reinis,

    You don't necessarily have to find a new developer. Reductions in time, temperature or agitation will reduce the resulting contrast. Increased dilution will reduce contrast.

    Rodinal is a popular developer on this forum and I'm sure that if you search the messages you will find some good advice on times and temperatures. Personally, I find that a little testing can be great fun. :>)

    Good luck,

    Neal Wydra

  5. #15

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    Yes, I found some recipes for D-76 anf Xtol substitutes.
    Guess I'll try to reduce the contrast and keep on using my Rodinal - I've plenty enough of it.

    I think I'll try to search the web agitation methods for Rodinal/T-max.

  6. #16
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    Tmax in Rodinal is do-able - I've done it, with OK results... but nothing really great. then again, no problems like the one Reinis describes - usually printed on multigrade through a 3, 3.5 filter... I think I may try Tmax again in about 20 years - right now I think I am just not good enough for it, and the results I have seen from others, even though nigh perfect, technically, I don't really find appealing.
    My humble opinion, from one beginner to another - try learning on a more forgiving film, traditional grain. I have found that APX100, 400 are very easy to work with, as well as Ilford FP4+, HP5.
    Even Delta films from ilford, although similar in technology... I find come out more life like and are easier to work with (but it might be just my bias).

    But, if you ever want to do a still "life" of some surgical equipment, Tmax is your choice - it will convey it accurately, in minute detail, with all the clinical coldness of the subject at hand... (joke!!! don't lynch me!)

    Besides, what good is a film that won't work well in Rodinal!!!??? (again, just joking)

  7. #17

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    T-MAX films have a nasty tendency for the whites to block up. White dress shirts on portrait sitters have no detail, but look like lighted lampshades. If you reduce development to tone down the whites, the middle grays become too dark and the photograph takes on a somber grim look.

    Some say that certain developers help to remedy this. Some say that T-MAX scans well for digital printing. Others actually like this funny look and judge it to be arty.

    My advice is to cut your losses and go with any traditional emulsion film, such as Tri-X, Plus-X, HP-5 Plus, Efke, etc.

  8. #18

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    It was great if I could get what I want, but You see - not every film is avaliable here in my country.

    Anyone hear about Jessops films? It's avaliable (The 30,5 meter roll)

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by reinis
    It was great if I could get what I want, but You see - not every film is avaliable here in my country.

    Anyone hear about Jessops films? It's avaliable (The 30,5 meter roll)
    which jessops film? I have used the 200 speed rollfilm and it was very nice.

    They do 100 and 400 for 35mm

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Cook
    T-MAX films have a nasty tendency for the whites to block up. White dress shirts on portrait sitters have no detail, but look like lighted lampshades. If you reduce development to tone down the whites, the middle grays become too dark and the photograph takes on a somber grim look.

    Some say that certain developers help to remedy this. Some say that T-MAX scans well for digital printing. Others actually like this funny look and judge it to be arty.
    Pyro devs do help. I used pyrocat and exactol. No probs with blown highilghts unless I wnet mad with dev time and I mean mad. Still looked dull as ditchwater tho. No soul....Acros is a different matter.....

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