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  1. #21

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    Metol-Hydroquinone Developer GAF 125
    Source: The Compact Photo-Lab-Index, Morgan & Morgan, 1977

    Water (125 F or 52 C)-------------------------------------750.0 ml
    Metol-------------------------------------------------------3.0 grams
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)--------------------------------- 44.0 grams
    Hydroquinone---------------------------------------------- 12.0 grams
    Sodium Carbonate (monohydrated)-------------------------- 65.0 grams
    Potassium Bromide------------------------------------------- 2.0 grams
    Add cold water to make------------------------------------- 1.0 liter

    Paper Development: Dilute 1 part stock solution with 2 parts water. Develop 1 to 2 minutes at 68 F (20 C).

    For softer and slower development dilute 1 part stock solution with 4 parts water and develop 1.5 to 3 minutes at 68 F (20 C).


    Kodak Developer D-72
    Source: The Compact Photo-Lab-Index, Morgan & Morgan, 1977

    Water (125 F or 52 C)-------------------------------------750.0 ml
    Elon (Metol)-------------------------------------------------3.0 grams
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)--------------------------------- 45.0 grams
    Hydroquinone---------------------------------------------- 12.0 grams
    Sodium Carbonate (monohydrated)-------------------------- 80.0 grams
    Potassium Bromide------------------------------------------- 2.0 grams
    Add cold water to make------------------------------------- 1.0 liter

    Paper Development: Dilute 1 part stock solution with 2 parts water. Develop 1 to 2 minutes at 68 F (20 C).

    For warmer tones, dilute 1 part stock solution with 3 or 4 parts water and add 8ml of 10% Potassium Bromide solution per liter of working developer. Develop 1.5 minutes at 68 F (20 C).
    Tom Hoskinson
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  2. #22

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    QUOTES = John Bartley

    Divided D23 for prints. Is that the 7.5 gr. metol and 100
    gr. sulfite D23 1st bath with a ? grams borax 2nd bath?

    "... I have tried using divided D23 on Ilford paper and it seemed to
    work quite nicely, giving dark blacks and nice whites. The caveat was
    that the bath "B" needs to be fresh, but it's just Borax anyway, so ..."

    Metol only paper developers do a good job but use carbonate.
    Ansco 120 is one well known. Beer's A is the same formula as
    Ansco 120 but 2/3 the strength. Those two plus Beutler's and
    FX-1 film developers all make good print developers.

    One needs only Metol, S. Sulfite, and S. Carbonate for that group
    to process film and paper. Add borax for the Divided D23.
    Have you tried S. Sulfite for that "B" bath? A 1 or 2%
    strength should do as well. Dan

  3. #23
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    Well, I'll behonest with you - I am fairly new to the darkroom (not totally, but somewhat), and I have always been very weary of mixing my own, simply because I believe in the old engineering adage which shows a direct relationship between reliability and the number of moving parts in a given device. In this case, I am the device, and all the things I do are the moving parts

    Seriously though, I have been very weary of mixing simply because it was one more variable (read: thing I can screw up). But after all the time you guys took to write down your considerable knowledge in this field, I feel I should give it a try. This mixing seems like someting I can do in my laundry sink without need for special equipment or ridiculous adherence to temperatures, etc. One more thing - how dangerous are these processes. Is there anything here that is so harmful that it requires more than the usual common sense and workplace clenliness?

    Thanks again,

    Peter.

  4. #24

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    One of the advantage of mixing your own is you remove one varialbe. Is Kodak/Ilford/Agfa/etc going to change what they sell you? Maybe they change it to save money. Maybe they change it for some other reason. But it happens.

    Equipment? Buy yourself a set of kitchen measuring spoons. That's how basic it can be. Or spend $20 and get a scale.

    Safety depends on the chemical. Different things have different levels of dangerous. Some are safer then the chemicals you already have in the laundry room. Some are the SAME chemicals. Some can be more dangeroug. Spending a little time reading and learning some basic safety rules is all it takes.

    Start with Jack's

    http://www.jackspcs.com/

    Then buy
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...51848?v=glance


    I mix to final dilution. I don't normally make stock solutions. That makes mixing my chemicals much easier then mixing up a package of dry chemicals from the store.

    Once you've done some reading go to:

    http://www.jdphotochem.com/

    You'll have almost anything you need more or less next day. At good prices. No worries about customs.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    One needs only Metol, S. Sulfite, and S. Carbonate for that group
    to process film and paper. Add borax for the Divided D23.
    Have you tried S. Sulfite for that "B" bath? A 1 or 2%
    strength should do as well. Dan
    Hi Dan,

    No, I have't tried that (yet ), and yes, I was using the 7.5+100 gram version. So far I've only tried varying the amounts of the components. I assumed from reading, that the "B" bath needed to be an alkaline "activator". I've also wondered about the term "divided". It's not really is it? It's more "extended"

    cheers

  6. #26

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    Divided D-23 is just a marketing term-( D-23 is basically a neutral pH developer. That second bath surely must raise the pH and change how things work.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by gnashings
    I feel I should give it a try. This mixing seems like someting I can do in my laundry sink without need for special equipment or ridiculous adherence to temperatures, etc. One more thing - how dangerous are these processes. Is there anything here that is so harmful that it requires more than the usual common sense and workplace clenliness?
    As has already been said, most of the chemicals needed to mix your own developer aren't any worse than what you've probably already got on hand in your laundry room or under your kitchen sink. For that matter, if you stick with D72 (similar to what Kodak sells as Dektol), you'll just be mixing the same chemicals you would have gotten in a single bag anyway. The added risk is mainly just a matter of having more of it on hand.

    If you're concerned about safety, research the chemicals involved. The worst that are very commonly used are probably hydroquinone and metol. (There are far worse that are used in some formulas, but they're not common enough to qualify as "very commonly used.") There are formulas that use neither, though. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) can often be substituted for hydroquinone, and phenidone can often be used in place of metol. (Phenidone has a reputation for being less of a health/environmental negative than metol.) In fact, there's a formula that makes these substitutions (and I believe a few other tweaks) to the D72 formula, known as E72. I've not yet tried it, but the description says it works much like D72.

    Some of the nastier somewhat-common chemicals include sodium hydroxide (aka lye), potassium hydroxide (used in Rodinal and probably some others), pyrocatechin, and pyrogallol (the last two are common in "pyro" formulas). There are also some nasties used in toning solutions. Check here for a description of most common and somewhat-common chemicals used in photography. Be aware that many of these descriptions are a bit on the alarming side. Try reading up on sodium carbonate (sold as Arm & Hammer washing soda), sodium borate (sold as 20 Mule Team Borax), sodium hydroxide (lye), and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) to provide some connect between these descriptions and real-world experiences.

    For general safety, you might want to buy some rubber gloves (there are some special considerations when working with certain chemicals, but I don't recall the details), splash-resistant goggles, and a dust mask. You might not need them when mixing all formulas, but you'll definitely want them for some. Note that this same equipment is good to have when creating solutions from pre-mixed packaged chemicals. Some formulas should be mixed in well-ventilated areas (their descriptions generally point this out), and of course exercise extra care when working with nasties like lye. The D72 formula's fairly tame, though, so you don't need to take really extraordinary precautions with it. E72's even safer.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Divided D-23 is just a marketing term-( D-23 is basically a neutral pH developer. That second bath surely must raise the pH and change how things work.
    According to the JT Baker MSDS on Sodium Sulfite, the pH of an aqueous solution is around 9 and thus is alkaline.

    Both D23 and POTA Developers rely entirely on Sodium Sulfite for their alkali.

    If you add a "B" bath containing a stronger alkali (Sodium or Potassium Carbonate or Hydroxide or one of the Borates) that will increase the activity of the developer.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  9. #29

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    [QUOTES = Tom Hoskinson]
    "According to the JT Baker MSDS on Sodium Sulfite, the pH
    of an aqueous solution is around 9 and thus is alkaline."

    At www.solvaychemicals.us will be found their ph numbers.
    Photo grade S. Sulfite has a ph of 10 and their MSDS for
    S. Sulfite specifies a ph of 9.6 to 9.8. From their home
    page search for, products .

    "Both D23 and POTA Developers rely entirely on Sodium
    Sulfite for their alkali."

    "If you add a "B" bath containing a stronger alkali (Sodium
    or Potassium Carbonate or Hydroxide or one of the Borates)
    that will increase the activity of the developer."

    The implication above is that borax has a higher ph than the
    sulfite he now uses for his "B" bath. That is not the case.

    I read most often phs of very close to 9.2 for borax while
    sulfite's ph will range from 9.5 to 10. Dan

  10. #30

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    Should have said metaborate.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D



 

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