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  1. #1
    thefizz's Avatar
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    Old fashioned film ???

    When a B&W film is described as old fashioned, what differences would this film have compared to a modern one.

    Efke iso 25 film is said to give an early to mid 20th century look. Does this old look apply to portraits only or landscapes etc.

    Retrophotographic have a new Classic Pan 100 eco film which they say has a real '50s' look. What look is this.

    Thanks,
    Peter

  2. #2
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Marketing hype. Define an "old look". This is like "silver rich" and other BS. tim

  3. #3
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    Perhaps the biggest difference between "old" and "new" is the silver grain structure - is it a t-grain (tabular grain - where the silver grains are a uniform shape and size, and so produce a finer grain structure for a given speed) or not. Films like Efke, Tri-x, FP4+, Bergger BRF, etc. are all "old" style non- t-grain films. Tmax, Fuji Acros, the Ilford Delta films are all t-grain films. T-grain films are often marked by stronger contrast along with finer grain, and sometimes have a harsher look because of it. The "old" films have a smoother, more gradual tonality, but stronger grain and somewhat less contrast. Of course, the contrast is highly controllable with changes in exposure and development. Grain size becomes a relative issue when you get up into larger formats, and becomes essentially a non-issue when you hit 8x10, unless you're cooking your chemicals in such a way to emphasize grain.

  4. #4

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    My idea of an 'old film' is really a single-layer emulsion. The last of it's kind was super xx. Efke (adox) films were the pioneer of multi-layer films in the 50s, so in a way it is the old new film.

  5. #5

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    Efke really is different from modern non-tabular (T) grain films, and darned near an alien species compared to T-films.

    Efke 25's color response is quite different from Tri-X 320 (for example). It is more green and red sensitive. Efke 100 PL has a beautiful exposure/density curve for my methods (Rodinal 1:50).

    I don't know if I got a batch variant, but in 4x5 the film is ever so slighty wider in the 4" dimension so that it is an excellent fit in Elite holders; it does not sag or move in the holder.

    Give it a try. It certainly is priced right.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
    thefizz's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info everyone.

  8. #8
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjstafford
    Efke 25's color response is quite different from Tri-X 320 (for example). It is more green and red sensitive.
    Blue and green, you mean? EFKE 25 and 50 are red-blind, not sensitive to red at all! While EFKE 100 is "normal" panchromatic.

    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    My idea of an 'old film' is really a single-layer emulsion. The last of it's kind was super xx. Efke (adox) films were the pioneer of multi-layer films in the 50s, so in a way it is the old new film.
    Ehrm... ADOX / EFKE were the pioneers of thin emulsion film, not multi-layer! EFKE 25 and 50 are both single-layer AFAIK. Super XX was the last of the thick-emulsion films.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Blue and green, you mean? EFKE 25 and 50 are red-blind, not sensitive to red at all! While EFKE 100 is "normal" panchromatic.
    I am not comparing Efke 25 with Efke KB or PL 100, but Efke 25 with (for example) Tri-X 320.

    I mean what I wrote. Efke 25 has a greater sensitivity to green and red (compared to blue) than Tri-X 320 film. Can you show me different information? Have you ever tried to develop Efke 25 under red safelight?

  10. #10

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    many people feel that foma films will give you a 1930s look .
    people are saying that the house brand at freestyle is foma
    great price too 1.39 a roll.

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