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Thread: 120 developing

  1. #11

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    All good advice so far. One more thing - you may find that agitation pattern and timing may need to be different with MF than 35mm, depending on your film/dev combination. I do 4x5 continuous, 35mm a couple of rotation/inversions every 30 sec (not too fast to avoid sprocket hole patterns), but I had edge to center issues with MF until I got the right combination of timing and "violence" when agitating. It took a lot more movement and more frequency than I thought it would to keep the edges from being more developed than the middle (I use Nikkor tanks). If you have this problem (and you may not depending on your materials) you may want to try tripod mount facing a wall about a half a meter away (no shadows) and focus at infinity. Expose to place the wall as a middle tone, or slightly lighter. Shoot all exposures identical. Process, do a contact sheet with grade 3 or so. You will know if you have even development. Normal subjects may mask uneven development (until the wonderful shot you made that has an uneven sky that you can't quite burn in to your satisfaction.)
    Best of luck, as someone earlier said, 6mm is a great format, and the negs look great coming out of the wash.

  2. #12
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyx
    I've got somewhat different question. I have Jobo 1520 tank and it is supposed to take two 120 rolls. How to load the second one? Or to make it more clear - how to get the first one "deeper" into the reel to make space for the second? Do you simply take it at the end and push it there by force until you reach that small red separator. Or is there some different way?
    I'm a little puzzled..? When loading two rolls of 120 on a 1520 reel, you first retract the red "pin" separator by pulling it out and away from the body of the reel. Do the clockwise/ counterclockwise exercise (a la Paterson) or "push" the film on until it reaches the reel core. Then press the red tab IN - behind the end of the first film. It will (usually) prevent the next film - loaded the same way, from overriding the first.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by nyx

    And other thing - how hard is loading 120 film in changing bag? I still don't have really dark darkroom, so I'm loading my 35mm film this way (and cursing aloud every time).

    You may not have a darkroom but you likely have a dark closet. Or wait until they turn the sun out for the night. While I've got a bag for emergencies it's a lot easier to walk into a big closet and load. If I intend to develop film the next morning I'll often load it the night before. Lay a towel etc along the bottom of the closet. If it doesn't face a big sunny window it'll be dark. Place your back to the door and any light needs to go around your body.

    One trick is to get a 11x14 tray or something similar. Put everything [tank,film and reels] onto the tray. With the lights off all you need to do is find the tray. Cuts the fumbling.

  4. #14

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    I never tried the back to back or one in farther than the other approaches. It would seem too likely to wcrew up the rolls and get overlap. There are those with experience that will say otherwise, and more power to them.

    However, look at the cost of taking a picture. The predominant cost is not chemistry or reels/tanks.. the predomminant cost is the time and effort and expense of getting to the destination for the shoot. So why risk all that and the once in a lifetime shots to some technique that saves you $50 over your life time?

    Buy a JOBO 1530 extension tank tube. It "bolts" onto the top of your 1520 tank. It will allow you to use 3 120 reels. If you use a 1510 tank, it works as well, but you are limited to 2 reels tall.

    Emulsion bases do differ in certain films from 35 to 120 to 4x5. The 120 backing is usually the thinnest, and therefore the easiest to bend. Certain 120 film is the hardest to load becasuse of this thiness. It takes a while to acquire the skills to load 120 easily.. Take your time and practice, practice, practice.

    Finanlly, use the new HEWES made SS reels in your 1500 series JOBO. They are specially made for your tank core ( big center hole). They work beautifully, much easier to load than the plastic reels, IMO. Part numbers are 1556 and 1555 ( or is it 1565 and 1566 ? I forget....) Remember they use the same plastic cores as the plastic reels.
    Frank Filippone

  5. #15

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    Hi Jimi,

    There are some great responses here and all of them relevent. Please practice with a scrap film first. Take care if loading in a changing bag, as your hands, arms and the film becomes 'sticky' with the moisture inside, causing the film to stick to itself. Remove the film from the paper backing SLOWLY, or you WILL cause a spark due to static discharge. I noticed this especially using T-MAX Film (which is still superb film to use). At the end of the film you will find a piece of sticky tape holding it to the paper roll. I usually fold this over the end of the film and find it 'rigid' enough to load onto the reel, especially when using Paterson reels. Also (what there's more?) try not to 'kink' the film otherwise you'll be left with small 'crescent' or 'thumbnail' white marks on the film which you cannot remove! Anyway, good luck with it.

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