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  1. #1
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Lith print exposure questions

    I have a couple of questions relating to exposure for lith printing. The general consensus seem to be exposing for an extra three-stops or so. In the books and comments online people seem to do that by adding time: taking an x-second exposure and leaving it in three times longer. Here's my first silly question, Does that give different results from simply incresing the amount of light by three stops? I'm thinking it must be different or people wouldn't sit through many-minute exposures, but then WHY would it be different?

    If it's not different, if you can just add light, then if you were doing a contact print could you not just stick it in broad daylight for a few moments? All three options (more time, more enlarger light, sunlight) as all as easy or as difficult for me.

    I've tried both extra time and extra stops but I'm not very good at lith printing to begin with and thought some others might have a definite opinion one way or another.

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    With how long a Lith print can take to develop I'm using an exposure meter. It's calibrated for normal developer. The thing is I measure closed down three stops then make the print after opening things up. I don't think it's a problem. If anything I wonder if it avoids the risk of recpirorcity failure.

    Sunlight is a lot brighter then my enlarger. I'd think even a few moments might be too bright.

    My problem with lith printing is the long developer times. By the time I've finished the first test print half the morning is gone-) The long times means I need long sessions to really learn anything. I'm tempted to set up multiple developer trays so I can have a few prints developing at once.

  3. #3
    ann
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    they may be different, as 3 times the inital exposure and 3 fstop more are not the same amount of time.

    controling the process is not easily done with just putting a contact print in sun light.
    People who do alternative processes that require UV light find that a UV box will give more consistent results than just placing the frame in sunlight.

    As with any process, the more you work the luckier you get.

  4. #4
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ann
    they may be different, as 3 times the inital exposure and 3 fstop more are not the same amount of time.

    controling the process is not easily done with just putting a contact print in sun light.
    People who do alternative processes that require UV light find that a UV box will give more consistent results than just placing the frame in sunlight.

    As with any process, the more you work the luckier you get.
    Hi Ann, yes, three times exposure is not necassarily three f/stops. Let me rephrase the question: Would exposing for the same amount of time while increasing the f/stop to the appropriate amount that gives three times the exposure produce the same result?

    With regard to sunlight, again I'm just trying to see if I can increase the amount of light for less time to get the same result. Consider it a theoretical question.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    My problem with lith printing is the long developer times.
    Two threads you might give a look: Why Pyrol Rather than ... ,
    my last post there, perhaps some clue as to;

    With Lith Prints is ... . There Bob Carnie tells of his regularly
    cranking out lith prints in three to four minutes. Alt. Photo,
    a week or two ago.

    Have you tried a minimal solution volume? Doing so could
    provide a clue to your problem. Dan

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu

    Have you tried a minimal solution volume? Doing so could
    provide a clue to your problem. Dan

    Minimal? I'm using the biggest tray I have and filling it to the brim-) The developers are fairly dilute.

    Fast development times are also going to mean more critical snatch times no?

  7. #7
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    Hi Nick
    My typical snatch time with lith is withing 3-5 min with fresh chemistry and over a printing session this may turn into 5-8 min. Beyond that I go fishing.
    If you are in the GTA area drop by and I will give you some of my A B to try out. I have seen some of the effects with really long ,long dev times and these are not the look I am after. I prefer the Corbjin look with my lith prints and work from there.

  8. #8

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    http://www.museiciviciveneziani.it/i...0copertina.jpg

    Bob like that one?

    I'm not getting the colour but I understand that's a function of paper.

    With Agfa I had to go with a water bath before the developer. Without it the developer would soak in from around the edges and the print would develop from the outside of the paper towards the centre. It was quicker but didn't work out right. By the time the centre was developed the outside of the 8x10 was way too far.

    I never had that problem with Forte paper. But the developer took longer.

    With both the Forte and the Agfa paper [with the water bath] I'm looking at over 10 minutes. Unless I expose the wrong side of the paper-)

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    I'm using Forte Fortezo and Adox Classic Art ( J&C Expo) with Fotospeed Lith developer. Snatch times average around 12-13 mins with best effects at 20 mins when developer becomes exhausted. Color range at longer times are yellow/peach/grey for Forte & chocolate for Adox. Fresh developer gives shorter snatch times with tones more in typical B&W range; but I've been trying for some of the effects that Tim Rudman demonstrates in his book. So I take "old brown" from last session as part of my mix for each session.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  10. #10
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Hi Nick
    Yes:that is one of the looks that I am working with .
    I have never had any luck with Agfa by the way.
    today printed with the lastest mix of sterling lith. just got a shipment from the UK. I absolutely love it . It will not make too many people happy but it is gritty with a nice yellow cast. strange horizontal lines but I am distressing the image so much it dosen't matter.
    I have never had to go over 5 min with development, seems to go against all the posts I have heard but my times are always withing 3-5 min.

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