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  1. #1
    pmu
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    tmax 400 at ISO200

    Can you guys help me, what would be the right time for developing Tmax400 35mm roll shot at ISO200 with tmax RS developer? Usually I use 24celcius temperature and 5 min for ISO400. I have 10 rolls shot at ISO200 and cannot find the information on the developing time... Thanks!

  2. #2

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    The Massive Dev. Chart at digitaltruth.com lists 12 min. for this dev. at 24C with a 1+1 dilution and an EI of 250. This should put you in the ballpark. I would invest another roll of photos of my dog, car, etc., and check this combo out before I went a processed all 10 rolls of my good stuff.

  3. #3
    pmu
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    Ok, I am a beginner in this developing thing but do I really have to increase developing time in pull prosessing? I have push-prosessed tmax400 shot at ISO 1600 with tmax rs at 7 minutes in 24 celsius temperature. Results are very nice. Is it really that I must increase the time to 12 minutes when I want to pull one stop? Sounds weird!


    EDIT> I normally use "stock" dilution in my prosessings but does this pull prosessing require that mentioned 1 part developer and 1 part water mix? And then increase that developing time?

  4. #4
    ann
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    it is very common to half the ISO of the manufacture rating, then develop about 20% less,
    or take a roll and use your standard times and see how you like the results.

    With dilution of developer it is also not uncommon to increase the development times.

  5. #5
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Generally, yes, you need to develop less to pull. With many developers, it's easier to dilute than to shorten time, especially if the time is already close to the recommended lower limit of 5 minutes -- it's hard to fill, agitate, and drain a tank consistently enough to give both even and consistent (from roll to roll) development if your time is under five minutes.

    OTOH, you can get close enough for printable negatives; I once developed Tri-X in HC-110 Dilution B at 90 F -- as I recall, the dev time was just about 3 minutes. Worked fine, though what I know now would suggest that was mostly because it was Tri-X; few other B&W films would survive that kind of temperature.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  6. #6
    pmu
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    Ok, if pull-prosessing means less prosessing time, how can it be that tmax400 shot at ISO100 must be developed 5,5 minutes (with stock dilution) when normal ISO400 developing time is 5 minutes (with stock dilution)??? (With tmax rs) Developing times taken from digital truth charts that is...

  7. #7
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Beats me. "Normal" for TMY, for me, is 19 minutes at 68 F in HC-110 Dilution G, continuous agitation first minute, then five inversions in 10-15 seconds every 3rd minute. N+1, aka one stop push, I give agitation every minute; N-1, aka one stop pull (kind of -- toe speed remains unchanged) I reduce agitation to every 5 minutes. The long development gives a toe speed similar to a one stop push with all three, but contrast is contolled by agitation; I can shoot at EI 640-800 with shadow detail comparable to what a "normal" process in, say, D-76 stock solution would give, or I can shoot at EI 200 and get shadow detail that looks as if I had a crew with reflectors on site (albeit overall contrast is a bit flattened).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  8. #8
    BradS's Avatar
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    Just finished dev'ing a roll of 400TMY. Rated it at EI 250

    HC-110(B): 5.75 minutes @ 69 degreees F agitate 10 seconds each minute
    Last edited by BradS; 06-25-2005 at 11:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
    lee
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    I dont consider 200 from 400 a pull development

    I consider that to be the real film speed of this film

    Develop it normally just like you would had you exposed it at what 400? you should have a nice increase in shadow detail. You may like the prints from the resulting negs somewhat better

    lee\c

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee
    I dont consider 200 from 400 a pull development

    I consider that to be the real film speed of this film

    Develop it normally just like you would had you exposed it at what 400? you should have a nice increase in shadow detail. You may like the prints from the resulting negs somewhat better

    lee\c
    That's exactly right. If one decreases his EI it is usually for the reason that the "rated" ISO is not acceptable for the equipment and shooting technique of the photographer. Therefore "normal" development would be called for. If on the other hand, the photographer wanted to compress his contrast, a true "pull" development would be called for.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

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