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  1. #1
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Delta 3200 in Delivery Suite

    My wife is due to give birth in three days. I'm planning on taking some pictures probably not during the birth itself but shortly afterwards. I'll probably be using my Hasselblad mainly with Delta 3200, and I'll be trying to be as unobtrusive as possible. I'll probably also bring my 35mm Olympus. I'm curious to hear of others' experiences and advice on photographing in delivery suites.

  2. #2
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Caulfield
    My wife is due to give birth in three days. I'm planning on taking some pictures probably not during the birth itself but shortly afterwards. I'll probably be using my Hasselblad mainly with Delta 3200, and I'll be trying to be as unobtrusive as possible. I'll probably also bring my 35mm Olympus. I'm curious to hear of others' experiences and advice on photographing in delivery suites.
    Great news Kevin!!! Let us all know how things turn out.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #3
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Thanks, Robert. I will keep you posted.

  4. #4

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    Hi,

    Been there, done that twice. I brought the Nikon, never took a picture. The experience of being a new dad, and helping with the birthing process was much more than enough to satisfy my life. The birthing room is one for pain, closeness, joy, appreciation, and most important, love. You will carry nothing more important away than those feelings shared with your wifey. Bring the camera, don't be suprised if you never use it. I have no regrets. And yes, she will say bad things to you, I guarantee it.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  5. #5

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    yes, keep us informed and good luck!

    My wife had two ceasers so from my experience, the operating room was pretty bright. We only took a P&S which with it's flash, accomplished the task... the nurse even managed to get me in the shot of me holding the newborn... she must have been a "photographer"! Both my sons were quite lazy upon being reefed out of their comfortable home and it took the pediatrician (spelling?) quite a bit to kick start them. Not a time I would have been fussing with f-stops anyway, then again it might have distracted me from what I could see happening, which might be routine for them but certainly wasn't for me!

    The normal delivery suites and recovery rooms (suites depending on where you are going) however are pretty dim, however at that point you might be able to supplement room lighting by opening the curtains or bouncing a flash off the roof without getting into too much trouble with wife or staff. Bit of a case of suck it and see!

  6. #6
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Kevin,

    my daugther was born last February-27. Unfortunately I was not allowed to take pictures in the delivery room (even without flash), so we waited for the baby to be returned to us after a quick check up. I have taken a few shots then in the hospital room with Delta 3200 developed in Microphen (stock) with a Nikon F100. You can see a sample shot here (scroll down to my post): http://www.apug.org/forums/showthrea...4&page=5&pp=10

    Best luck to you and your wife and let us know

  7. #7

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    Congratulations Kevin and the best to you both I'd recommend you soup the Delta 3200 at twice the speed you shoot it, but others here may have other experiences

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by TPPhotog
    I'd recommend you soup the Delta 3200 at twice the speed you shoot it, but others here may have other experiences
    Tony is pointing out the true Rule OF Thumb when it comes to Delta 3200!

    And btw CONGRATULATION WITH THE BABY TO COME

  9. #9
    titrisol's Avatar
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    I couldn't tkae pictures while my wife was giving birth, was too busy holding hr hand.
    I took pics of the babies after they were born with a PS and flash, and of mommy a few hour later.
    It is probably the most unflattering moment to take pics of your wife, as I learned after our 1st baby.

    However, i took my Spotmatic with D3200 (as 1600) and took a lot of pics of the baby as she came back after clean-up. Very beautiful pictures. The film was developed in DDX
    Mama took my APX away.....

  10. #10
    MattCarey's Avatar
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    Hello--and congratulations!

    Our second was born 5 weeks ago. For the first one, things were rather tense, so a camera wasn't really on my mind (actually, due to family pressure, it was, but I vetoed the idea). My wife understood, but would have liked to see a picture of the little guy (9 1/2lbs!) being cleaned up.

    So, for the second one, we brought in a small Kodak digital. The anasthesiologist (sp?) was a bit of a nut, and he took a picture of me and my wife--well, our heads at least. He says that people can tell that I was smiling under the mask, but I don't see it. I did get a picture of the baby as he was being cleaned up. Now, here came the tricky part. They then asked me to carry the baby to the nursery. Here I am in a bunny-suit (high tech gown), being told not to touch anything in the operating room and they want to hand me a baby--while I have a camera in my hand. Where do you put the camera? Pockets are covered up! I shoved the camera in my sock, took the baby and walked. The nurses stated that no one had ever done that before!

    Now, for the rest of the visit, I had my Canonet with Delta3200 in it. Very grainy and contrasty, but I got shots that I couldn't have any other way. I really could have gotten away with ASA 1600, but I shot at 3200. It was a very high-tech hospital (wireless internet access--I checked APUG in our room!) Lots of silicon valley families with tons of digital cameras. I feel fairly sure that I was the only one with a canonet (and a Mockba).

    Now, I will say that with my first, the canonet and the Tmax3200 I used worked great. My all-time favorite image was taken then. The quiet shutter and lack of flash (plus the fact that no one takes that thing seriously) means that I got shots of my wife and baby in the NICU where she didn't even know what I was doing. Not bad considering I was about 5 feet away (prefocus, compensate for exposure--the canonet only goes to ISO800, raise the camera and shoot--no one knew!).

    I will say that I sent the film off to A&I both times. I have screwed up enough TMax3200 and high speed Fuji film to give up when it comes to important shots.

    Now, what shots you take are up to you. I was told (needlessly) not to look over the curtain at the actual operation. So, no shots of the actual birth. Other people make different decisions.

    One last comment--both times I took a still life of the items on our table. Nothing of value artistically, but the mundane items bring back memories.

    Take Care!

    Matt

    p.s. when my father in law saw the recent set of proofs, he only had one comment: "They still make B&W film?"

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