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  1. #1
    Mark_Minard's Avatar
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    Ilford Archival Sequence

    Hi all,

    I was wondering how many here use this method, and if so, do you normally store prints in a water bath after fixation until the final wash sequence. I can see how doing this might cause problems with the amount of fixer absorbed into the paper, perhaps making longer wash times necessary (I use Multigrade IV FB).

    Thanks for any insight and advice!

    Mark
    "Through photography I would present the significance of facts, so they are transformed from things seen to things known..." Edward Weston (1932)

  2. #2
    ann
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    we do, however; after the fix we rise them off and then put into a water bath, until a few are ready for the washing stage.

  3. #3
    geraldatwork's Avatar
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    After fixing I place my prints in an archival washer. Usually during a print session I will accumulate 8-12 prints. However every 1/2 hour to 45 minutes or so I turn the water on for about 5 minutes which is enough time to cycle the water so the fixer doesn't accumulate.
    "When elephants fight it is the grass that suffers"
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  4. #4

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    I wash in either a rotary washer or archival washer, the acrhival is not a problem as each print is kept separate so you can start the wash time for each print as it added to the washer, but in the rotary washer I wash in a large batch. So I keep the water flow to a trickle, then when I am ready to wash I turn up the flow until the drum begins to rotate for the final wash. I pull the prints before the final wash for a soak in a clearing bath. I have not found any hypo when I test at the end of the wash cycle.

  5. #5

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    I give my prints an initial 30 second fix in rapid fixer and rinse well before putting into a holding tray of tap water. When I am done for the day, I wil refix the prints in a fresh batch of rapid fixer for 60 seconds, rinse, tone, put into 2% Sodium Sulphite with agitation for 10 minutes and wash thoroughly.

    Works for me.

  6. #6
    blansky's Avatar
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    For fiber I use a two fix system then into a 20x24 tray with a syphon wash for about 5 minutes then into permawash for 3-10 minutes then into the archival washer to soak. When I'm done printing I run the archival washer for about an hour.

    I usually selenium tone so for that the print goes from the 2 fix system to the syphon tray for 3-5 minutes, then into permawash for 3-10 minutes then into the syphon tray for 3-5 minutes. Then into selenium for 4-8 minutes then into syphon tray for 3-5, then permawash for 3-10 then into the archival washer.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  7. #7
    Mark_Minard's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone; very helpful advice... The well at my new house isn't up to the old 60 min. wash cycle I learned from AA, and I've been trying to trim it down to modern standards.

    P.S. Michael, I'm removing the Weston quote from my signature!
    "Through photography I would present the significance of facts, so they are transformed from things seen to things known..." Edward Weston (1932)



 

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