Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,905   Posts: 1,521,390   Online: 1073
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1
    hortense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    5

    MF Film that CURL!

    New into MF ... First tried Arista.EDU 400 and when it dried (even with hanging weights) it CURLED ! Am I going to find this on all MF roll film? If so, does anybody have any reasonable solution? [How about Acros100?]

  2. #2
    kaiyen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    bay area, california
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    331
    Images
    4
    Arista.edu, which is/was Forte, is notoriously curly, even after drying with weights. Most films are not that curly after drying.

    allan

  3. #3
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,895
    Images
    26
    I have also found that foma and efke curl quite a bit. It seems to come along with the "traditional emulsion" films from central and eastern europe. I have no problems with curling with Ilford, Kodak, or Agfa.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    Another medium format film notorious for curling is the chinese made Lucky brand. Unlike the Forte films though, this film curls up into a tube along the long axix of the film.

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,158
    Images
    20
    I'll concur--the East European 120 films curl more than Kodak, Ilford, Fuji, and Agfa. Use wide weighted clips, dry thoroughly, store flat in sleeves, and they'll flatten out.

    Arista.EDU film used to be Forte, but now is Foma, so which you have would depend on when you bought it. I think the new version is Arista.EDU Ultra and should say "Manufactured in the Czech Republic." Forte is manufactured in Hungary.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    I believe, without any supporting evidence that Hungarian film upon drying tries to take the form of a Goulash noddle. This I believe is a matter of national pride. Why do you suppose they call it Foma?

    How you set for glass carriers?
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  7. #7
    Mongo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    960
    One thing that I've found that helps the curling phenomenon: having the film dry more slowly reduces the curl somewhat for me. In the winter, when the furnace is running and the air is dry, I put a small bowl of warm water in the bottom of my film drying "cabinet" (actually a hanging garment bag). In the summer when the humidity in my home is higher I don't bother.

    The film will still curl, but probably only about half as much.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  8. #8
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    I use a lot of Efke 50 and curling has never been an issue for me at all.
    I currently use Kodak Rapid Fix with Hardener, a short (fill and dump a few times) rinse, Permawash, longer fill and dump wash, dip thru Photo-flo, wipe off surface water and dry in slightly warm, moving air with a wooden clothespin at the bottom for weight.
    No experience with Foma but I'll keep your experience in mind.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  9. #9
    hortense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    5
    Thanks everyone! I think I'll shift to other non-curling films. Actually, I am quite impressed with what I've heard about Fuji Acros 100 ... so, I think I'll try it. What about higher ASA films (e.g., 400)?

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,158
    Images
    20
    I shoot lots of Tri-X. Delta 400 is a nice film. I prefer Tri-X and Delta 400 to HP5+, but some people prefer HP5+. I think T-Max 400 is one of those films that looks better in larger formats than smaller formats, but it has its advocates. Any of these films is capable of good results, if you like it.

    Buy a roll of each, see which appeals to your taste, and stick with it for a year.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin