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Thread: Sow's Ear

  1. #11

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    Absolutely. However, I want to eat it in person. One cone for me...one cone for you. I will tell you when.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  2. #12
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    The unannounced change in grade 2 Azo a few years back (longer development times, less contrast) was due to the change in the gelatin formula forced upon Kodak by the change in the quality of the cow bones. Hideous though it is to think about, it's essential to the process of making both film and paper.

  3. #13

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    In two words, beef bones is correct. Pork is also used.
    I found a wealth of gelatin information via the WWW.
    Seems it also goes very well with ink jet papers. Dan

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighead
    No wonder I get hate mail from PETA once or twice a year.... They've seen how much film I go through.....

    I'll bet a lot of those folks eat Jello and don't realize where it comes from.

  5. #15

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    Maybe, but seeing the number of questionable alternatives being pushed, I think they're becoming aware.

    More seriously, If they could use nitrocellulose in the old days, isn't there a modern synthetic polymer that could be used instead? Is this a matter of inertia, i.e. they figure they'll be out of film before they'd recoup the costs of reengineering their emulsions to use the alternative, or that the organic functionalities in gelatin are currently too hard to reproduce on that scale for consistent quality?

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    Absolutely. However, I want to eat it in person. One cone for me...one cone for you. I will tell you when.
    It's a deal! Just as soon as I get the car running again. It's been stored for thee years.

  7. #17

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    As long as your buying I will drive.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  8. #18
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    Mmmmmm... Sows Ear flavored Jell-O [drool]
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by fparnold
    More seriously, If they could use nitrocellulose in the old days, isn't there a modern synthetic polymer that could be used instead? Is this a matter of inertia, i.e. they figure they'll be out of film before they'd recoup the costs of reengineering their emulsions to use the alternative, or that the organic functionalities in gelatin are currently too hard to reproduce on that scale for consistent quality?
    Nitrocellulose was used for the support in the old days. The gelatin silver suspension (it's not really an emulsion even though we call it that) was coated onto that. Today we use different and more stable plastics for the support, but the gelatin silver light sensitive layer is still with us.

  10. #20

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    Actually gelatine is a pretty amazing protein. There really isn't anything like it for photography. There is a whole chapter about it in Haist's "Modern Photographic Processing".

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