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  1. #21
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by derevaun
    If I could just piggyback a related question: what tanks fill and empty fast?
    The only one I have a well-known time on is draining the Kindermann lid. It drains a full liter in about 10 seconds. I don't have a fill time, because I'm not watching the timer when I fill, and I start counting development time just as I cap it and start the first inversion.

    I recall the AP/Samigon being pretty fast, and have actually read an entire article about how fast the Paterson System 4 drain/fill speed is (can't recall where). I think consistency is more important than speed unless you're dealing with very short development times, or perhaps a very long tank.

    If you need to get things in and out of the developer fast, and your darkroom setup allows it, try using two tanks and transferring between pre-soak / developer / stop with lights out.

    Lee

  2. #22
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I'll admit that an SS tank is not exteremly fast to fill and drain so I just go for consistancy. When I had a truly dark darkroom I used a series of tanks without tops filled with my solutions and put the reels on a lift rod. I'd just drop the film reels into the solutions, tap to remove the bubbles and agitate using the lift rod. Not a daylight process but virtually eliminates the fill/drain time variable.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  3. #23

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    One more weigh-in. I go with Kinderman tanks, Nikkor reals. As a bit of trivia, the true Nikkor real did not have springs in the center, just a piece of heavy SS wire that wrapped around three sides of the "box" formed by the supports in the middle. (the ones with the springs were all knockoffs). It was the only place you could insert the end of the film and loaded fantastically easily once you got the knack (5 minutes). Unfortunately, they cost twice what the ko's did, and eventually went South. Very hard to find, but the best, in my book, no springs, no clips, simple.

  4. #24

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    I've not been long in the developing world, but I am more than happy with my 1 euro Gepe 120 tank. It has an "easy loader" that looks like a plastic version of the Hewes loaders. I even managed to load a badly kinked roll and salvage some shots. You feed the film through the loader and close the holder on the centre of the reel. Then, just wind the reel and remove the loader. Reel (sic) easy!

    I also use this tank to develop 9x12cm and 5x4" sheets one or two at a time.

    I also have a Loadamat 20 which is like anm Agfa Rondinax tank. Daylight loading of the film as well as adding and draining chemistry. I've not really used it yet, though it may be worth sacrificing a roll.

    I haven't got a 35mm tank yet (the Gepe only has a 120 reel).

  5. #25
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Earlier this year I changed from 120 processing in Paterson tanks to SS tank and Hewes reels. The Hewes reels are the duck's guts, made to last forever. My tank has a plastic lid, but I've just ordered a new tank with a SS lid (Samigon), and some 35mm SS reels and more 120 SS reels (not Hewes).

  6. #26
    lee
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    one thing that I failed to mention wrt steel reels is that they can easily be loaded wet. Last I heard and it has been a while was that plastic cannot be loaded without drying them. If you have a lot of film to be developed you don't have to wait for the plastic to dry.

    lee\c

  7. #27
    hortense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedarkroomstudios
    Tilt tank to a 45 degree angle, helps a lot. Search for previous thread (about 2 weeks ago) with quite a lot of other ideas and tank/lid preferences for pouring speed.
    To make development time less critical, increase the development time by increasing the dilution so that complete development is in the 10 to 12-minute range. After 12-minutes, the fill and pour times relative to the total development time are low enough, one need not be concerned.
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  8. #28
    Ole
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    I have a Paterson tank for "small" films, and a Jobo for 9x12cm / 4x5". They both drain in seconds, and I like them both. Among my other "old odds and ends" are a few Johnson tanks, one for reels and one for cut plates. I have used them both for stand development, since agitation can only be done by gently pouring out the developer and equally gently pouring it back in. To be avoided!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #29

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    I use these tanks from Paterson. Great plastic tank and reels. I may go stainless later, but they work SO great. I have a tank what takes two 35 mm reels and another that takes 4 35 mm reels. Furthermore I have a bucketfull of reels so no problems with having to dry the reels that I just used before I can develop another round of film.


  10. #30
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    This is one of the few things for which no opinion exists, only a statement of plain fact. Lab ware has always been the place where the bad is cheap, the good is dear, and the only bargains were the ones that hurt to buy. There USED to be an adage in Photography, "Spend as much as you can afford on as little as you need." In darkroom work, it's always true.

    Ahem.

    Steel.

    The best tanks are Kindermann. With the plastic lids.

    Old school, best reels were Nikor. TODAY, HEWES. The Hewes are perfect.

    Kindermann reels, very good.
    Nikkor tanks, OK.

    My Kindermann tanks, bought new in 1970 are perfect after about 14,000 rolls of film. I've replaced the lids a couple times. The original Nikor reels are like new, the Hewes... which are still in production... I hope, fantastic.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

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