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  1. #1
    ggriffi's Avatar
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    How to dry sheet film

    I have just gotten my first LF negs to turn out and then realized that I didn't have a clue about how to dry them. So how does everybody go about it?

    Thanks,
    g

  2. #2
    Sean's Avatar
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    I bought a zippered plastic hanging clothes bag, it's diameter is about 2ft. square. I then hang my negs inside the bag at a slight angle and zip it up. Seems to work very well and was cheap.

  3. #3
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    A winter project last year was a negative drying cabinet that uses filtered, heated air to rapidly dry film. Made it from MDF, with a 1/8" plexiglass glazing in the door.

    Air is drawn into the cabinet by a small computer fan behind the white filter on the upper right side of the cabinet. It goes into a plenum that is separated from the film compartment by a furnace filter (not visible in the picture). Air flows down past the film hanging on hooks from a metal grate, and then out a louver at the bottom back of the cabinet. There is a 200W light bulb just below the furnace filter, in the air path, that both provides light inside the cabinet, and also heats the air.

    The result is that the warm, filtered flow of air across the negatives dries them in about half an hour.

    The metal grate is a scrap of Closet Maid shelving suspend on wooden cleats attached to the sides of the cabinet. I have a mixture of legitimate film clips, and plastic clothes pins that I use to hang film - I can hang up to eight sheets or rolls (the cabinet was designed to allow a 36 exposure roll of 35mm film to hang between the metal grate and the bottom of the cabinet).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Negative dryer small.jpg  

  4. #4
    hortense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    I bought a zippered plastic hanging clothes bag, it's diameter is about 2ft. square. I then hang my negs inside the bag at a slight angle and zip it up. Seems to work very well and was cheap.
    I put 4 at time of my 4x5 negatives into an 8x10 tray using approximately 16-oz. of distilled water with about 10ml of Calgon. Then I hange them up with a clip on on corner a let them dry. If I lived in a humid clilmate, I would also add some isopropyl alcohol to increase the evaporation rate.
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  5. #5
    John Bartley's Avatar
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    I wash my negatives very well, then hang them by one corner with clothes pins. The clothes pins are strung up by shower curtain hangars on the shower curtain rod over the tub.

    cheers

  6. #6
    rjs003's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley
    I wash my negatives very well, then hang them by one corner with clothes pins. The clothes pins are strung up by shower curtain hangars on the shower curtain rod over the tub.

    cheers
    Same here haven't had any problem with this method and it is low cost.
    Helps if you have at least two bathrooms. One for film and one for the wife.

  7. #7
    ggriffi's Avatar
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    I do have two bathrooms, and I appreciate the info.

    Hortense,

    I do have an issue with humidity how much isopropyl alcohol would you add to the solution you recommended?

    g

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I hang them over the bathtub using a spring-loaded clothesline like they have in hotel bathrooms (after one minute in Sistan 25ml/l). You can find one in a hardware store.

    I highly recommend Jobo sheet film clips, though they are expensive, particularly if you plan to move up in size. The Jobo clips hang the film so it is perpendicular to the line, so you can get more sheets on the line (very handy for 8x10" and larger), and they hold the film in place with a pin, so the sheets never fall down (so far so good even with 11x14"), and contact area is minimal.

    Here's a batch of 9 sheets of 8x10" I just finished--
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN2220.JPG  
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto
    A winter project last year was a negative drying cabinet that uses filtered, heated air to rapidly dry film. Made it from MDF, with a 1/8" plexiglass glazing in the door.

    Air is drawn into the cabinet by a small computer fan behind the white filter on the upper right side of the cabinet. It goes into a plenum that is separated from the film compartment by a furnace filter (not visible in the picture). Air flows down past the film hanging on hooks from a metal grate, and then out a louver at the bottom back of the cabinet. There is a 200W light bulb just below the furnace filter, in the air path, that both provides light inside the cabinet, and also heats the air.

    The result is that the warm, filtered flow of air across the negatives dries them in about half an hour.

    The metal grate is a scrap of Closet Maid shelving suspend on wooden cleats attached to the sides of the cabinet. I have a mixture of legitimate film clips, and plastic clothes pins that I use to hang film - I can hang up to eight sheets or rolls (the cabinet was designed to allow a 36 exposure roll of 35mm film to hang between the metal grate and the bottom of the cabinet).

    Nice job!!!

  10. #10
    MikeS's Avatar
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    Doing it cheaply!

    I got an extra shower curtain rod along with the metal clips/loops that hold a shower curtain, and instead of a curtain I hang clothes pins from them. A bag of something like 50 plastic clothes pins cost me something like $2.00 the curtain rod was about $5.00, and with my current setup (2 rods) I can dry 12 sheets at a time with no problems. As I have this shower dedicated to photo use (no curtain, and a 16x20 print washer on the floor in the shower), I've been thinking of getting a couple more rods so I can do more sheets at a time.

    I can also dry RC prints easily using the same clips!

    -Mike
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails sheetfilmdrying.jpg  

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