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  1. #11
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Without seeing the film itself, it is difficult to diagnose. One question ... does the area of increased density extend beyond the frame itself into the margins where the imprinting is, and/or the space between frames? If not, I would suspect a sticky shutter blade. Open the back and look at the shutter in operation, especially at the slower speeds. This is not a perfect test, but it may be of use.

    If it DOES extend into the margins, It would indicate a light leak, in loading, or when not being exposed. A good test of this would be to advance the film - NOT expose a frame or two, and leave the camera in bright sunlight for a periond of time. Block the lens, try another frame, using a lens cap or something, and process the unexposed film. A light leak would show up as an area of density on the unexposed frame.

    Or ... Flare? Where was the sun, and was/ is the lens free from MAJOR (it would have to be really noticeable) scratches and/ or contamination?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  2. #12

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    Use photo paper test strips to isolate it.
    Imitation cameras come with big egos, real cameras do not include accessories.

  3. #13

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    I wonder if the light leak occurs when you change the lens? If it occurs on frames where you inserted the dark slide & swapped lenses, then you could try a couple of tests. Put on the 135 lens BEFORE loading film, and go out and shoot the entire roll with that lens. If there is no fogging, then you could do the "hold it in the sunlight while inserting the dark slide" torture test. It could be the seals where the dark slide is inserted. I wonder, does your 135 lens have the rectangular rubber seal glued on the back? I could envision some trouble if this piece was missing.
    Those who don't think Photographers have the skills of REAL artists such as painters obviously have not had to spot my prints.

  4. #14

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    Good Morning, Derek,

    I use a Koni-Omega. A recent experience MAY be relevant.

    A couple of months ago, I shot a partial roll at an event, then headed home (250 miles south) with the Koni hung by its strap facing forward in the passenger seat of the car. The lens cap was on; it was a bright sunny day. When I processed the film, there was some fogging on the last couple of frames I had shot. As nearly as I can tell (guess?), the fogging occurred because of a small light leak through the slot where the magazine dark slide fits. I did not have the dark slide in the magazine at the time. I have never previously had any such problem, but, then, I'd never previously subjected the camera to four and one-half hours of direct sunshine aimed almost exactly at the dark slide slot. I don't know if this is your problem, but it's worth checking out.

    Konical

  5. #15

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    First, I'm not familiar with your camera, or with 120 gear generally, so if I say something that's ridiculous in that context, please just ignore it. That said, I do have a couple of points to make, based on my experience with 35mm cameras:

    • As rexp suggests, the leak could be associated with changing your lens, rather than with the lens itself. If the shutter isn't completely light-tight, changing the lens can expose it to much more light than would occur by just removing the lens cap, thus increasing the fogging compared to leaving the lens on at all times. To minimize the problem, change lenses inside or at least in the shade, and do it as quickly as possible. Even just turning your back to the sun when changing lenses can help.
    • You may be able to isolate the problem by using a flash in a dimly-lit room. Put the flash somewhere where you suspect the light leak to be, such as pointing into the lens opening when the lens is removed. Wrap the whole camera/flash assembly in a dark towel, leaving the camera back open so that you can see the area where the film normally resides. Then use the test button on the flash. If everything's wrapped properly, you should see very little light from the flash, except for any leaking area. (It may take a few tries to completely cover the camera, including all its edges; a small gap in the towel can leak enough light to swamp any leak around any in-camera leak.)

  6. #16

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    As far as the 135mm lens is concerned I haven't been able to appreciate how fine the lens is yet because I just got it and all but one exposure with the lens exhibits the light leak.... :-(

    This is a total bummer because the lens looks brand new, not a mark is on it!

    Derek

  7. #17

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    Hey wow thanks for all the good suggestions. I'll be checking things thoroughly for light leaks. The thing about all this that is particularly disturbing is that I just had the whole shebang serviced. All of my lenses, backs and the body were all just worked over to the tune of several hundred dollars.

    Derek

  8. #18

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    Someone over on photo.net has suggested that one of the leaves in the shutter on this lens may be dragging and remaining open too long. Does this sound like a reasonable assessment?

    Derek

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dealy663
    Someone over on photo.net has suggested that one of the leaves in the shutter on this lens may be dragging and remaining open too long. Does this sound like a reasonable assessment?

    Derek
    It's a darned good suggestion. Now that I look again, the light contamination does seem to have a conspicuous optical pattern.

  10. #20

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    As the gentleman with the Mamiya 645 mentioned, if the fogging extends past the frame lines... ie: is on the rebate edge. The fogging is not coming from the front of the camera ie: the lens. It would have to be coming from the back or handling ...

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