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Thread: B+W Films

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Brooke
    Thankfully exp. compensation is very easy on this camera. Given people's advice, I'm going to start off with FP4s and HP5s. I'll be selective about shots and bracket 2/3, 1/3 over and on the camera's recommendation. Good plan?

    With thanks again, Jonathan.

    Yup, good plan. Your Ilford choices are excellent. Try them for awhile, see how you like them and maybe switch to another. APX 100 is a fave of mine. I've never tried Fuji's contributions to b/w, but they have many fans out there. There are also the Efke and Foma films to try.

  2. #12
    Blighty's Avatar
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    HP5 is exposed at iso 320 and developed in D-76 1+1 for 8.5 minutes.
    Jonathan,
    Welcome to the club! I usually rate HP5 at 200 asa and develop in D76 (1+1) for 11 mins. Sorry if this sounds confusing; it's not meant to! It's just part of the fun of experimentation which will ultimately lead you to your preferred film/dev combo. Enjoy yourself! Regards, BLIGHTY.
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  3. #13
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    Yes.... after seeing a few of your photographs in the gallery, you might find HP5 an excellent choice. I usually rate it at 200, spot expose it for the shadows and develop in D-76 (ID-11) at 1+3 for 13 minutes. It's a forgiving film when learning to develop, too, especially if your tempuratures are not always consistent.

    Good luck!
    (P.S. don't tell Morten, but I've never tried Rodinal! Shhhhh!)

  4. #14

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    Pick a 400 speed easily available and stick with it. Id11 or D76 mixed and put into small one time use glass bottles will serve you well. Skipping around will get you nowhere.

    At some point,after 50 rolls, you can try Fp4 or Delta 100 so you will have two films, one slow, one fast. Thats all you need.

    This is all about control and making a neg that is decent. Trying all kinds of different things will take too much away from the learning experience and getting to know one film well.

  5. #15
    Jonathan Brooke's Avatar
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    May I ask, politely of course, why you recommend HP5/400? My personal taste - so far - is for sharpness and fine grained photos and given that, I'd rather use slower film most of the time. Those photos are my preliminary snaps by the way, I haven't started telling the camera exactly what I want it to do yet; just switching it to apature priority, keeping an eye on the exposure time and letting the camera take the metering decisions. Subject matter will also settle down. Most of the time I'd rather to be occasionally saying to myself 'I needed a bit more speed there' or 'this shot would have benefitted from more grain' than more often (probably) wishing my pictures were finer grained.

    However, as always, my ears are open. I am after all a beginner.

    Jonathan

  6. #16
    noseoil's Avatar
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    I think the suggestion for a 400 speed film is probably meant to make shooting easier. Faster shutter speed, better depth of field and no tripod makes learning a bit easier. If you enjoy working with the slower film, by all means, do it. I started B&W with Efke 25 as my film of choice (but I tend to be a masochist in some of my work) and had to learn to work with asa 12. Basically, no shot without a decent tripod. If you do go with the FP4, try to get a good tripod and learn how to use it well. It will do more for you in terms of composition and thought than just the point & shoot approach. tim

  7. #17

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    2nd the tripod!!! Before you buy any lens, flash, etc. Get a tripod!

  8. #18
    hortense's Avatar
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    That's a Great site!
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

  9. #19

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    I'd just like to add that every film has its fans. Put another way, no film is completely worthless -- every film is liked by somebody for some purpose. You can spend lots of time experimenting to find what you like best, but as others suggest, it's probably best to stick with just a couple of films at first.

    Also, store brands like Jessops are really just rebadged versions of some other manufacturer's films. In the past, many store brands were really Ilford, but I gather that Ilford's terminated such arrangements, so stores have switched to other suppliers. I don't know who Jessops uses offhand, but it's probably perfectly good film.

  10. #20
    abeku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blighty
    Jonathan,
    Welcome to the club! I usually rate HP5 at 200 asa and develop in D76 (1+1) for 11 mins. Sorry if this sounds confusing; it's not meant to!
    LOL! Yes, it's tiresome to hear each and everyone having their preferred combination! I think this thread gives you some excellent starting points. Depending on which type of enlarger (or scanner) you will use for your negatives you will find your own preferred developing process for the film. I also recommend to have a standard procedure of developing film; same temperature, agitation and so forth. It helps a lot when trying to find the ideal combination for your needs.
    Hmm, iso 200 for 11', I'll give that a try...

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