Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,986   Posts: 1,524,036   Online: 915
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: B+W Films

  1. #1
    Jonathan Brooke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Stockton-on-Tees
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    35
    Images
    6

    B+W Films

    As a beginner in B+W (i.e. got my first non point and shoot in june and haveonly shot 2 B+W films so far with it) I have no idea which films have what characteristics, except of course that faster means grainier. My two films so far have been a Jessops Pan 100s (I didn't want to waste a good film on my first go) and an Ilford FP4 Plus. Since my subject matters are different on each film and the FP4 unfortunately got printed at the shop on high gloss I haven't even got anything I can use as comparison. Currently I'm putting an Ilford Pan 100 through.

    When I get back to university this autumn, I'll be able to start printing my own stuff; I don't however want to waste too much time figuring out which type of film I like best.

    ISO 100 will probably be my standard fare but since I don't have fast lenses or access to a tripod all the time I'll have to use 400 sometimes. When I do have a tripod to hand I'll use 50 possibly.

    Any advice?

    Cheers, Jonathan.

    P.S. I got pleasing results on both, but I have no idea if they would have been better on the other film type.

  2. #2
    Marc Leest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hasselt, Belgium
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,267
    Images
    12
    Well, FP4 and id11 and you have a good starter. I recommend to overexpose: use iso 80 or iso 64 to register more detail in the shadows. Delta100 is a very good film to start with too. Have fun and experiment.
    We cannot change how the cards are dealt, just how to play the hand...
    Randy Pausch

  3. #3
    noseoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,898
    Images
    17
    Jonathan, try one film for a while and see how it goes. If you spend too much time hopping from film to film, it is more difficult to get a feel for any one type. Try a few months with one to become more familiar, then move to see how the next film responds. Just keep shooting! tim

  4. #4
    clogz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,836
    Images
    114
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

  5. #5
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    The general advice is to stick with one or two films and developers for a while until you get some idea of how they look with your kind of subject etc. I'd suggest keeping it simple, so FP4+ and HP5+ developed in ID-11 or ILFOTEC HC if you don't want to mix up ID-11 from powder (these are all Ilford products) and you must check out Rodinal for a different look (sorry, but it's a APUG requirement: everyone must at least try Rodinal once - it's a law, or an old charter, or something... ) .

    Have fun, Bob.

  6. #6
    abeku's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    426
    Images
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F.
    The general advice is to stick with one or two films and developers for a while until you get some idea of how they look with your kind of subject etc. I'd suggest keeping it simple, so FP4+ and HP5+ developed in ID-11 or ILFOTEC HC if you don't want to mix up ID-11 from powder (these are all Ilford products) and you must check out Rodinal for a different look (sorry, but it's a APUG requirement: everyone must at least try Rodinal once - it's a law, or an old charter, or something... ) .

    Have fun, Bob.
    I was thinking in the same terms! Go for FP4 and HP5 for a while. I usually expose FP4 at 125 iso and develop in D-76 (ID-11) 1+1 for 9 minutes. HP5 is exposed at iso 320 and developed in D-76 1+1 for 8.5 minutes. I have found Chris Johnson's development time charts as a good starting point. There, you'll also find some suggestions for Rodinal and FP4/HP5...
    Have fun!

  7. #7
    Jonathan Brooke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Stockton-on-Tees
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    35
    Images
    6
    Thanks for replying everybody, your comments are valued. I'm sure I'll find out about Rodinal at some point! As to chemicals I'm not sure what my Uni's Photographic Club stocks yet, as I have yet to join.

    Unfortunately my Nikon F75 doesn't have a manual adjustment for film speed and I presume the DX strip gives FP4's speed as 100. What would be the appropriate exp. compensation from 100->125 and from 400->320?

    Thanks again, Jonathan

  8. #8
    Marc Leest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hasselt, Belgium
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,267
    Images
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Brooke
    Thanks for replying everybody, your comments are valued. I'm sure I'll find out about Rodinal at some point! As to chemicals I'm not sure what my Uni's Photographic Club stocks yet, as I have yet to join.

    Unfortunately my Nikon F75 doesn't have a manual adjustment for film speed and I presume the DX strip gives FP4's speed as 100. What would be the appropriate exp. compensation from 100->125 and from 400->320?

    Thanks again, Jonathan
    the DX strip will make it 125 so it think a compensation of 2/3 stop overexposure wil yield at ISO 80. M/
    We cannot change how the cards are dealt, just how to play the hand...
    Randy Pausch

  9. #9
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Brooke
    Thanks for replying everybody, your comments are valued. I'm sure I'll find out about Rodinal at some point! As to chemicals I'm not sure what my Uni's Photographic Club stocks yet, as I have yet to join.

    Unfortunately my Nikon F75 doesn't have a manual adjustment for film speed and I presume the DX strip gives FP4's speed as 100. What would be the appropriate exp. compensation from 100->125 and from 400->320?

    Thanks again, Jonathan
    Alternately, you can buy DX labels from Jessops that you stick over the film can's own DX strips - unfortunately, they do not have 80ASA, but do have 50 and 100. Another trick is to gaffer tape over the film can's DX strips and see what the camera gives you (usually 100ASA I think by default). If the camera lets you set compensation easily then that will obviously be the most flexible method and will allow you to set the best compensation (if any) for your way of shooting and developing.

    Or... some Blue Peter skills, kitchen foil, glue and this (http://www.bythom.com/dxcodes.htm) website and away you go (and no sticky-back-plastic needed)...

    Cheers, Bob.

  10. #10
    Jonathan Brooke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Stockton-on-Tees
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    35
    Images
    6
    Thankfully exp. compensation is very easy on this camera. Given people's advice, I'm going to start off with FP4s and HP5s. I'll be selective about shots and bracket 2/3, 1/3 over and on the camera's recommendation. Good plan?

    With thanks again, Jonathan.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin