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  1. #1
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Acufine with FP4 and/or Tri-X

    I'm curious about Acufine. If I shoot film at normal speed, FP4 at 125 and Tri-X at 320 or 400, will it give accurate contrast anyway? Or does it have to be at the recommended EI? Will shooting at normal speed actually be considered overexposing then?
    Will it also affect grain size?
    Thanks,
    Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #2

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    Acufine is for increasing the "speed" of a film. I use it for indoor shots at weddings where I can shoot Tri-X at EI's of 1000 to 3200.

    Yes, shooting Tri-X or FP-4 at or near their rated speed and then souping in Acufine would be way too much; unless you cut way back on the time, and then you risk inconsistant results because the film was in contact with the developer for a long enough time.

    If you want to use these films at or near their rated speed, I'd go for D-76 or another "normal" dev. If you want to shoot these films at higher EI's, Acufine is a good one.

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Thank you Jim for your insight. It's curious that the Diafine is time/temp insensitive, and that it will develop negs to desired contrast, but it appears that a 1-2 stop overexposure would cause problems.
    That doesn't make sense to me. I'll have to test it I think to understand it. I've used Rodinal for so long now that it's hard for me to imagine how other developers would work.

    Thanks again,

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4

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    Just to make sure, Acufine and Diafine are different developers. Overexposing with Diafine would probably result in a high contrast negative, since underexposing it leads to low contrast negs.

  5. #5
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre R. de Avillez
    Just to make sure, Acufine and Diafine are different developers. Overexposing with Diafine would probably result in a high contrast negative, since underexposing it leads to low contrast negs.
    Diafine's results depend on the peculiar nature of a film. In other words, depending on the film, with Diafine you get different results. Test, test, test.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  6. #6
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huggyviking
    I'm curious about Acufine. If I shoot film at normal speed, FP4 at 125 and Tri-X at 320 or 400, will it give accurate contrast anyway? Or does it have to be at the recommended EI? Will shooting at normal speed actually be considered overexposing then?
    Will it also affect grain size?
    Thanks,
    Thom
    Acufine gets a bit of its speed increase from being a phenidone developer. Depending on your time and agitation, it will slightly exxagerate the natural curve of the film. Test it.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I use Acufine quite a bit. I rate conservatively--EI 800 for TX, EI 640 for TXP/TXT and J&C Classic 400. I generally target my Acufine negs to print on grade 3. I keep it in a 5-quart 5x7" deep tank so it's always there ready to use, and I replenish with Acufine replenisher.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  8. #8
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Back in the "day" (actually, the 1980's), I spent several years maintaining film surveilence (sp?) cameras in banks. The company I worked for had hundreds of them. All were loaded with 100 ft rolls of Tri-x and I used two developers. For the cameras that were not in bright enough areas for ISO 400, I set them for ISO 1000 and developed the film in Acufine.

    The negs were fine for our purposes (our purposes being the FBI prosecuting felons) but were contrastier and grainier than the negs souped in D76.

    YMMV, of course :rolleyes:

    Alas, those days are gone. Long before d******, banks were switching to videotape ... Videotape looked like crap compared to film.

    David

  9. #9
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Thank you everybody for your help and insight. I am planning to try out Acufine, and just to clear up my mistake mentioning Diafine, I meant Acufine all along.

    It seems that most people use this developer to push film. I want to experiment exposing film at normal EI.
    Since the claim is that the developer is not time/temp sensitive, over- or underexposure shouldn't be much of a problem either, according to my logic. I guess I'll find out.
    Thanks again everybody,

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #10

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    Thom, Diafine is not temp/time sensitive (to a great degree, at least). Acufine, to the best of my knowledge, IS. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

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