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  1. #11

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    thanks tom!
    that would be great

    - john

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnFinch
    MONOBATH DEVELOPER

    Water (50c) 600ml
    SODIUM SULPHITE (Anhyd) 50.0g
    HYDROQUINONE 12.0g
    PHENIDONE 4.0g
    SODIUM HYDROXIDE 4.0g
    SODIUM THIOSULPHATE (Hypo) 110.0g
    WATER To make 1 Litre

    Do not dilute for use.
    Process for 6 min's at 20c. Agitation for first 30 seconds then 15 sec's every minute on the minute. To adjust the contrast use greater or lesser amounts of Hypo. Use of more will result in a softer image, less increases contrast.
    I have not tried this myself but saved this formulae because I'm dying to give it a try sometime. Have fun!
    John, with one exception, this is Grant Haist's Monobath MM-1 formulation. The exception is the addition of 8ml of a 25% solution of Gluteraldehyde. Haist states that this formulation will produce identical results to D-76 when processing Verichrome Pan.

    Note: In this formulation, sodium thiosulfate (pentahydrate) is 110 grams. Sodium thiosulfate (anhydrous) is 70 grams.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #13

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    Very interesting..... Tom, do you know what the Gluteraldehyde is used for?

  4. #14

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    I have heard of Formaldehyde being added to Monobaths, as an emulsion hardener. Maybe it does the same job?

  5. #15
    Ole
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    Glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde (formalin) are both used in several lith developers. I assume they have similar effects, mainly to harden the emulsion.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16

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    Yes, it is used in the fprmulation as an emulsion hardener.

    Patrick Dignan indicated (B&W notes, June 1972) that a monobath softens the emulsion more than most development processes and has a tendency to produce reticulation, therefore a chemical hardening agent must be added to the formula.

    In a monobath, development is a "race" between the developer and the fixer. As a consequence, monobaths usually use a very active developer formulation.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  7. #17
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    I just tried Gainer's trick of adding fixer concentrate to the developer after the completion of development, and I like it.

    I was just testing a new filmholder and just had to do one 4x5" sheet of Efke PL100, and I've been wondering what to do with an excess of Zonal Pro rapid fixer that I have on hand since switching to TF-4, and this is it. I developed the film in a tray in 300 ml of PMK and added 50 ml of fixer concentrate and fixed for 2 min. This was too much fixer and reduced the stain slightly from what I usually expect with PL100 in PMK, but the neg is still pretty good with no obvious pinholes, and I'd definitely do it again, but with less fixer concentrate. It was quick and easy, and I could develop, fix, and wash in one tray.

    Comparing the use of Polaroid type 55 with the need to coat prints and clear and rinse negs anyway, it's not much more difficult to use this method for similar applications (i.e., test shots and situations where I'm not worried about archival stability).

  8. #18
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    From G.W. Crawley
    750 ml water
    50 grams Sodium sulfite
    1 gram Phenidone
    12 grams Hydroquinone
    70-125 grams Sodium thiosulfate, pentahydrate
    10 grams Sodium Hydroxide
    Water to make 1 liter.

    From H.S.Keelan
    750 ml water
    50 grams Sodium sulfite
    10 grams Phenidone
    15 grams Hydroquinone
    110 grams Sodium thiosulfate, pentahydrate
    18 grams Sodium hydroxide
    18 grams Potassium alum
    Water to make 1 liter.
    Both say to add the Phenidone to the water and DO NOT mix. Adn to use COLD water when dissolving Sodium Hydroxide as it generates considerable heat. If you use hot water, explosive violence can result in serious burns.

    You should check your library for Stephen G. Anchell's "The Darkroom Cookbook" from Focal Press.

  9. #19
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    Monobath Developers

    I've thought that it would be fun to play with monobath developers, and see what kind of results i get (not expecting anything great). Does anyone have any ideas / formulas for a monobath developer?

    Am i correct in thinking that its basically strong developer mixed with a rapid fixer?

    Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

  10. #20
    Ole
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    It's basically a strong developer mixed with a slow fixer - most of them, at least. Otherwise it's a super-fast developer mixed with a rapid fixer...

    I have played a bit with it, and in my case found the grain to be a problem even with my 5x7" negatives. Instead I've turned to "two-bath monobaths" - single shot developer, pour in a dash of rapid fixer concentrate at the end of development. Works great, and gives surprisingly good results. My last attempt at this was with a ISO 400 film in Neofin Blau topped up with 100ml 60% ammonium thiosulphate, which should have given very obvious grain on 35mm film (from the Neofin). It didn't.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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