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Thread: Kodak HC-110

  1. #11
    BradS's Avatar
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    HC-110 is great stuff. Simply can't be beat for its economy and ease of use. I shoot mainly FP-4, 320TXP, and 400TMax and soup all of them in HC-110. I'm in the process of converting all of my process to dilution D (1+39). I find this one a little easier to work with (compared to the standard dil. B) and prefer the results. Everything in my gallery (except one) was done in HC-110.

    If it was good enough for the likes of Adams and Weston...

  2. #12
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Covington's site is very good. Use the medicine syringe: great.

    HC-110 can be used very well in dilutions like 1+50 ~ 1+100. Building on the direction set by Adams' use of HC110 as a long scale developer, I found that by reducing agitation (say, 5 secs per 3 or 5 minutes) the tendency to build contrast in the highlights of some films is tamed. You can really achieve any affect with this stuff, and if I had one developer to use for any format, in any circumstance, it would be HC110.

    Pretty good for developing fiber paper for those really long scale negatives, too.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  3. #13
    mmcclellan's Avatar
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    Mike,

    HC-110 with Tri-X, and to some extent HP-5, is awesome stuff! But throw out ALL the times you get from Kodak and do your own tests. First figure out what your true ASA is (probably half the manufacturer's rating) and then test for development. You'll end up with an exposure index (ASA) and development times that are not even close to what Kodak tells you, but the results will be gorgeous.

    And, like other postings say, mix it straight from the bottle -- I use a dilution of 1:61 to make two even quarts and the developing times are in the range of 8 mins or so with Tri-X; that works much better than using dilutions A or B, as specified by Kodak, as the times will be very short.

    Are you shooting large format? Or small/medium? Not sure I would use it with 35mm, but with larger stuff, it's great.
    Michael McClellan
    Documentary Photographer
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    http://www.MichaelMcClellan.com

  4. #14

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    I've been very pleased using HC-110 with 35mm Tri-X, Agfa 100 & 400, TMX, and FP4. I plan to test it with HP5 next. I use it 1:60 with reduced agitation for improved shadow detail. I figure HC-110 only costs me around $1 a month to use, and is very convenient; I use a 10ML measure to dilute from concentrate. Plus if Kodak ever discontinues their chemistry I can just switch to Ilfotec HC.

  5. #15

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    HC is a very nice developer. It works nicely with PanF and FP4. If you run out of Rodinal you might want to try the HC110 with those films.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  6. #16
    dphphoto's Avatar
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    Hi: weighing in again. I've used HC110 with 35mm and gotten great results. TMX shot at 64, TMY at 250 and dilution E (about 7 min at 70 degrees for me, but do your own testing) work well. Also works well with Ilford HP5 at 320.
    dphphoto

  7. #17

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    HC-110, Ilfotec HC have a couple common characteristics: They are highly stable concentrated developer stock solutions that do not tan or stain the emulsion under development. Depending on what end purpose you are trying to achieve, the lack of staining and tanning capability can be a blessing - or a curse.

    HC-110 and Ilfotec HC achieve their long term stability by using an organic solvent (instead of water).

    In principle, most concentrated developers can be prepared in organic solvents (like the glycols, glycerine or triethanolamine). If you mix your own, you are not restricted to using non-staining and non-tanning commercial concentrated developers.

    See Pat Gainer's postings (and others).
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  8. #18
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    I have a question,
    I have used HC110 since it was first introduced by Kodak. I am well aware of it's qualities, and would hate to not have it available in my Dar_ aah err
    aaah bathroom.

    My question is who has used HC 110 as a developer with the "stand or semi stand" technique? And what were the results? I have been studying the "archives" and have found much fantastic information there, I admit I hav'nt searched that much for mention of HC110. But would like to know if it works.

    Thanks,
    Charles

  9. #19
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Read Ansel Adams for a starting point. It works. It's easy.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  10. #20

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    Good Evening, Charles,

    In response to your question about HC-110 as a stand developer, I can only pass on the experience of one attempt. A couple of months ago, I did night shots of a floodlit subject. I shot four sheets of T-100 which I drum-processed in Technidol, my normal developer for night shots. I made one additional exposure and processed that sheet for 90 minutes using HC-110G as a stand developer. The stand-developed sheet is definitely denser overall and somewhat more contrasty than the Technidol-processed sheets; development appears to be quite even across the sheet, and it is a printable, though not ideal, negative. I intend to redo the shot and try the HC-110G at 45 minutes. I am hoping to zero in on an appropriate time for the HC-110G as a stand developer for my night shots, simply because it is a lot cheaper than Technidol. I hope this gives you a starting point.

    Konical

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