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Thread: X-Ray Film

  1. #11

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    re; X-Ray film

    It's sensitive to visible light. XRay film holders have an "intensification screen" in them that fluoresces when bombarded with XRays, that fluorescence (visible light) is what exposes the film. The XRay films I've worked with are double coated with no anti-halation layer, so both sides expose at once.(a speed enhancer?) Back in the day, Freestyle sold "Aristo" Rare Earth Blue XRay film which was cheap and fast, it was very popular with pinhole photographers. (after Freestyle got out of the XRay film business, I ended up with a box of Fuji XRay film, slower, but finer grained) I experimented and got good results with D-76 and HC-110.
    Good Luck, Have fun, Tracy

  2. #12
    Helen B's Avatar
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    "The XRay films I've worked with are double coated with no anti-halation layer, so both sides expose at once.(a speed enhancer?)"

    In the case of the fluorescent material (intensifying screen) being in close proximity to the sensitive plate rather than projected onto it by a very fast lens (eg a 90 mm f/1), the sensitive plate is sandwiched between two layers of fluorescent material to get the maximum amount of exposure without degrading the resolution too much - the maximum distance between the fluorescent material and the light sensitive emulsion is kept low by having two thin layers instead of one thick one.

    The dispersion of the light as it travels through the thickness of the intensifying screen limits the resolution to around 4-10 lp/mm, so fine-grained high resolution film isn't necessary.

    Best,
    Helen
    Last edited by Helen B; 08-19-2005 at 12:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    TracyStorer - do you remember the approximate exposure settings you used when exposing the Fuji film? Or can you give an approximate speed? I'd like to do some testing but I have no idea where to start in terms of exposure.

    It's good news that D-76 works as a developer, as that's what I normally use. Did you use normal temperature / dilution or something different?

    Also, if you have any of hte negatives, could you provide some scanned examples?

  4. #14

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    They(Fuji XRay film negs and contact prints) are 14"x17" and too big for my scanner. Try exposing at ISO 50 or 100 as a starting point.

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