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  1. #11
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Basically, the bromide that is in the formula is a safe amount to prevent fogging.

    Working under bright safelight, and developing for 5 to 7 minutes, I get no fog. That, of course, describes my darkroom. Three to 4 minutes under any safelight I think will be safe.

    What you get with a restrainer-less developer is the ability to insert 1 to 2 zones into the highlights without affecting the rest of the scale. You can do the same with 120/selectol.

    What you get by leaving out the HQ, of course, is the superadditive effect, the source of your *snap & sizzle*.

    There is just enough glycin to work slowly and build up the areas of greatest exposure.. the blacks... and you get remarkable depth and transitional tones, not to mention a pure black equal to dektol or amidol.

    I'll speculate that without the restrainer, you'll have too much metol-- it won't fog, but it will work so quickly, the glycin won't build the shadows as well as it could.

    With restrainer, I speculate the glycin has little to no effect.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  2. #12
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Can't really comment on your glycin/metol developer, but Dektol used to be sold as a universal developer; instead of 1+1, 1+2, or 1+3 as for paper, you'd dilute 1+9 for film (as suggested in another post). The low sulfite levels mean any grain that's present is in its original (crisp, gritty) form, not modified by any solvent action, and the rapid development may reduce film speed a little compared to a long, slow soak in diluted HC-110 or Ilfotec HC (which, BTW, is said to be very similar to HC-110 in both usage and results). I've used Dektol to develop Verichrome Pan, 6x6 on 620 and liked the results, but I was contact printing at the time, with one of those light bulb in a box printers, all with materials and equipment that came from a yard sale in the early 1970s.

    OTOH, I've got a LOT of Dektol around right now; I just might dunk my next Fomapan 100 9x12 cm negatives in it and see what I get...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  3. #13
    gainer's Avatar
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    I presume your abbreviation "gr" means "grams". Officially, it means "grains" of which there are 15.385 to the gram. Just picking nits.
    Gadget Gainer

  4. #14
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gainer
    Just picking nits.
    Thanks! Can't stand those itchy little b*st*rds

    You're right...I meant grams...

    Murray

  5. #15

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    hi murray -

    can't comment on your developer, but if you ever switch to ansco 130 for film ( best with sheet film ) i'll be happy to tell you what i know. one suggestion is to use your developer at about 70º or so, i heard somewhere that glycin loves the warm environments and you will get better results from it at those temperatures.



    donald -

    i love hearing of folks using dektol ( d-72 ) as a film developer i've spoken with many olde-timer news-guys that used dektol on a regular basis to process their films ... isn't it the same formulation ( or close to it ) as ansco 125 ( also a universal developer ) but using 80g of sodium carbonate instead of 65g


    ... now if i could only find out the formula for "GAF UNIVERSAL DEVELOPER"
    ( in the red can! ) i'd give up everything else and only use that.

    -john

  6. #16
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    I don't recall if D-72 is the same as Agfa 125 -- I've got formulae for both bookmarked here somewhere, but it doesn't really matter. Pretty much anything close to either one will work well with both film and paper. Honestly, HC-110 does a fine job developing paper, it's just too expensive to use that way (as are most film developers). OTOH, I've got 2.5 gallons of double strength stock Dektol here that I'd dilute 1:17 (making 50 gallons of film strength working solution), and the box cost $20. Question is, can I use it fast enough; four ounces of this stock, diluted 1+7 (to equal standard Dektol 1+3), is still going strong after 18 8x10 prints in a 4 hour session, which means unless it goes off from age I'll be through my *second* box of paper before I use this stuff up.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  7. #17
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Update Time

    It took 5 days and the answer is...yes. 12/15 is a universal developer, but it doesn't match the accutance of HC-110.

    My method was to go out and photograph full scale subjects with Tri-X in the even numbered holders and HP5+ in the odd numbered holders, taking the same image with both films. The negatives were printed at max black time with the prints given the same processing.

    Using a Zone VI Compensating Developing Timer in "film mode", the Tri-X would get my usual 6 minutes in HC-110, dilution E, tray developed with agitation every 30 seconds. Then I would try the HP5+ at various ASA's, dilutions and times until the Zone I exposure got nailed. Once that was found I tried playing with the dilution and times until zones V to IX printed properly.

    Using my 120ml Schnieder at 160 ASA (my 210ml Schneider at 320 ASA...go figure?) the development for HP5+ in 12/15 @ 1:7 dilution was 10 minutes with agitation every 30 seconds.

    I've got three more days of holidays, so I'll see how it reacts to plus and minus development situations.

    I don't know if I can live with the loss in accutance...it's really hard to describe, but with a 120ml lens the edges of raindrops on a surface 15 feet away at 11x14 print size with the HC-110 negatives are crisp, and the 12/15 negatives are "somewhat diffuse", using a loupe.

    I would post examples, but I don't have a scanner. The prints are almost identical and I don't think there would be much of a difference on a computer screen anyways.

    Good fun

    Murray
    Last edited by MurrayMinchin; 09-02-2005 at 10:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    I don't recall if D-72 is the same as Agfa 125 -- I've got formulae for both bookmarked here somewhere, but it doesn't really matter. Pretty much anything close to either one will work well with both film and paper. Honestly, HC-110 does a fine job developing paper, it's just too expensive to use that way (as are most film developers). OTOH, I've got 2.5 gallons of double strength stock Dektol here that I'd dilute 1:17 (making 50 gallons of film strength working solution), and the box cost $20. Question is, can I use it fast enough; four ounces of this stock, diluted 1+7 (to equal standard Dektol 1+3), is still going strong after 18 8x10 prints in a 4 hour session, which means unless it goes off from age I'll be through my *second* box of paper before I use this stuff up.

    i know what you mean about using it up fast enough!
    a bunch of years ago i had no $ left but a boatload of paper and film, and a huge can of "gaf universal developer" it has resided on the (interior) windowsill of the studio i had been renting i am guessing for a long long time, since it had not been opened, and gaf stopped making the developer a long long time ago. the window was boarded up, but it was still drafty, and the winters were cold and the summers hot (new england). in an act of insanity i punctured the can and mixed it up. i didn't really have anything big enough (bathtub?) to mix 10 gallons up at once so i kind improvised ... then i had to find 10 amber jugs ( luckily a friend was getting rid of 7 of them and i had 3 or 4 ) ... it was the summer and about 100º all day and in the 80s all night and i figured i had to use it as fast as possible - i shot boxes of 4x5 paper, dozens of rolls of film and printed lots of prints until it was all used up. it was great stuff, and now i am kind wishing there was some way i could find some more.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by MurrayMinchin
    ...I don't know if I can live with the loss in accutance...it's really hard to describe, but with a 120ml lens the edges of raindrops on a surface 15 feet away at 11x14 print size (using a loupe) with the HC-110 negatives are crisp, and the 12/15 negatives are "somewhat diffuse"...

    Murray
    Murray - what the heck is a 120ml lens?
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  10. #20
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    Murray - what the heck is a 120ml lens?
    Why Tom, I'm SHOCKED you've never heard of them...they're very rare...only the best of photographers have them...just low-life photographers use 120mm lenses

    (D'Oh!!!!!!!!!!!!)

    Murray

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