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  1. #31

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    Because of the small size of the 35mm negative and the large magnification required, the standard advice is to avoid overexposure and overdevelopment in order to achieve smaller grain size. This means adjusting your exposure to produce the thinnest negative which will produce acceptable shadow detail and adjusting the negative contrast so that you print on grade 3 paper rather than grade 2.

  2. #32
    JohnArs's Avatar
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    Oh to improve your negs, there is only one answer, take the best take XTol!!

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnArs
    Oh to improve your negs, there is only one answer, take the best take XTol!!
    XTOL is really very good for 35mm film IF you want very fine grain and good sharpness - you won't get the edge effects or some of the other benefits of staining developers but XTOL would be my first choice - With MicrodolX and D-23 coming up as a close second.

    If I want the finest grain - I would not use Rodinol or PMK
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  4. #34
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Gerald,

    Well summarized. However.

    I've found, for my eyes, that there is a relatively insignificant penalty in 'grain' while generous exposure and minimal agitation contribute significant improvement to scale and tonality. Not to mention the higher percentage of successful exposures due to the greater tolerance to error.

    I think the high performance of current films, both t-grain and 'old' technologies, has much to do with this. Avoiding excessive agitation is also responsible.

    I have no argument with the old rules. But it is essential to determine, after mastering the rules, which give you the results you want.

    cheers
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

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