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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott.

    My regular film developer is D-76 which I buy in 1 US Gallon size packs for £3.93, so therefore not really worth the bother of making from scratch.
    I can then make print developers fresh, as and when I need them.
    Ah, but if you wish to make your D-76 from scratch, it would cost you considerably less. Plus, you can make all the variations of D-76 that you wish.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard
    Ah, but if you wish to make your D-76 from scratch, it would cost you considerably less. Plus, you can make all the variations of D-76 that you wish.
    Good point Jim, trouble is, there are so many D-76 derivatives.

  3. #13

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    Yes, there are many. My point, FWIW, and I guess I should have stated this, is to pick a D-76 varient that will tweak your film to suit your needs; to give it that little extra something.

    I've been mixing my own for about 3 years. I call it playing "Evil Scientist". It's great fun and quite a money saver.

    Have fun, J

  4. #14
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    Good Old DK-50 !

    For ages it was the standard sheet developer for Kodak, then replaced by HC-110.
    Dilution A for HC-110 is often similar to DK-50 straight. Dilution B often is the same as DK-50 1:1. A good starting point for development time would be HC-110 b.

    It is a wonderful portrait developer, giving nicely compressed shadows, splendid midtoned, and sparkling highlights for accents. Be warned this is desirable for portraiture, and could be disastrous for some landscape work.

    In the studio I first worked, we used DK-50 most of the year. In the summer months, we switched to D-76, which worked slower, and more suitable to processing film at the ambient temp of 75 degrees in the darkroom.

    Even I, who thinks RODINAL AND TRI X are a match made by angels, think DK-50 isn't really so good for 35. BUT it is wonderful with Plus X in 120. It should do nice things in FP4, which has a tendency to a long straight line curve. TXP or TMY could get out of hand quickly, since they already want to have an upswept curve.



    Crawley had something interesting ways to use DK-50 as an acutance developer. Check out some old ( circa 1980s ) BJP almanacs if you're interested.

    Have fun.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard
    Yes, there are many. My point, FWIW, and I guess I should have stated this, is to pick a D-76 varient that will tweak your film to suit your needs; to give it that little extra something.

    I've been mixing my own for about 3 years. I call it playing "Evil Scientist". It's great fun and quite a money saver.

    Have fun, J
    It may work out cheaper if I bought the Sulphite in 5kg packs and also 5kg packs of the Carbonate for the print developer, trouble is, it`s not clear anymore what exactly Kodak put into D-76 these days (see the MSDS on the Kodak website).
    I suppose I could try modifying a formula such as Adox MQ Borax and perhaps try the same balance of Borax and Boric acid as used for the Ilford ID68 formula although I`m not sure if it would work. Maybe I should stick with much published formulae that`s more in the public domain for non-chemist like myself.

  6. #16

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    Over here, across the pond, I buy sod. carb decahydrate. It's sold here as Arm & Hammer washing soda. A short conversion from anhydrous or mono will you to use this.

    I also mix my own D-76/D-76 versions; I'm too cheap to buy the real stuff.

    I BARELY made it thru high school chemistry and I'm mixing my own stuff quite successfully. Being a chemist is not required!

    I can't say about your altering the Adox formula; never tried it. But, as always, do a test roll first and if your mixture doesn't work for film, don't toss the leftover--some of these disasters make ok print devs.

    Grab copies of Anchell's "Darkroom Cookbook" and Anchell & Troop's "Film developing Cookbook"; lots of great info and recipes in there.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    Good Old DK-50 !



    It is a wonderful portrait developer, giving nicely compressed shadows, splendid midtoned, and sparkling highlights for accents. Be warned this is desirable for portraiture, and could be disastrous for some landscape work.

    In the studio I first worked, we used DK-50 most of the year. In the summer months, we switched to D-76, which worked slower, and more suitable to processing film at the ambient temp of 75 degrees in the darkroom.





    Crawley had something interesting ways to use DK-50 as an acutance developer. Check out some old ( circa 1980s ) BJP almanacs if you're interested.

    Have fun.
    This is something I found interesting, I downloaded the MSDS for DK-50 from the Kodak website and unlike D-76, DK-50 is/was sold as a two-part powder.
    This data sheet showed the weight of the components in part A containing Hydroquinone and Elon to hold the equivalent of 5 grams per litre, perfectly logical when you consider that in the published formula, there is 2.5 grams of Elon and Hydroquinone respectively, but in part B containing the sulphite and Metaborate etc, this holds approximately 37.9 grams of components per litre.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdef
    Keith,

    if you're game to try an alternative to DK-50, given the chems you have on hand, you might try:

    Bath A

    Water 750ml

    Sodium sulfite 36g

    Hydroquinone 3.6g

    metol 1g

    ascorbic acid 4g

    KBR 1g

    water to 1 liter

    Bath B

    water 750ml

    sodium metaborate 100g

    water to 1 liter

    This is an extremely economical, two-bath developer. Contrast can be controlled over a wide range, by adjusting the time in the A bath. Start with 3min A/ 2min. B for normal contrast with most films, and adjust as necessary. Normal, intermittent agitation in the A bath, and one inversion/30 sec. in the B bath. Both solutions have very long shelf lives, and the A solution can be re-used until there is not enough solution left to cover the film between agitation cycles. The B bath can be made up one-shot, by making a .2% solution (2g/liter) of sodium metaborate, instead of a 10% solution, but you'll have to test for times. Any other alkali, including sodium carbonate, borax, or sodium hydroxide, can be used as well, with some testing.

    Expect surprisingly fine grain, and excellent sharpness. I realize that you don't list ascorbic acid among the chems you have on hand, but it's widely available in pharmacies and health food stores. This formula is also the basis for a very good print developer, when modified to a single bath. The attached photo was made with a similar developer, using phenidone instead of metol, and BZT in place of KBR, for both the negative and the print. The negative was made on Forte 400/EI 400, developed in DRU undiluted (same as paper developer) for 60 seconds/70F. The paper was Ilford MG warmtone, and was developed in DRU for 2 min. I use this developer exclusively for paper, and in many forms for film. It can be diluted from the single bath stock, and used one-shot, or used undiluted for extremely short development times, or most economically, as the two-bath developer described above. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me directly. Good luck.

    Jay
    I`ve tried two-bath developers before including Leitz/Stoecklers and Tetenal Emofin and have been disapointed with the tonality of the prints made from negs souped in these(Sorry), but thanks for the suggestion anyway.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott.
    This is something I found interesting, I downloaded the MSDS for DK-50 from the Kodak website and unlike D-76, DK-50 is/was sold as a two-part powder.
    This data sheet showed the weight of the components in part A containing Hydroquinone and Elon to hold the equivalent of 5 grams per litre, perfectly logical when you consider that in the published formula, there is 2.5 grams of Elon and Hydroquinone respectively, but in part B containing the sulphite and Metaborate etc, this holds approximately 37.9 grams of components per litre.
    Hm - 37.9 grams versus 40 grams - not much of a difference. And, Kodak may have put a couple grams of Sodium Sulfite into Part A to help the Elon (Metol) go into solution.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  10. #20
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    [QUOTE=Keith Tapscott.]It may work out cheaper if I bought the Sulphite in 5kg packs and also 5kg packs of the Carbonate for the print developer, trouble is, it`s not clear anymore what exactly Kodak put into D-76 these days (see the MSDS on the Kodak website).
    QUOTE]

    I recently found that a chlorine removal powder sold at pool supply place close to the house is actually sodium sulfite. They also had another brand for the same purpose but was sodium thiosulfate. The sulfite was in 5lb pails so this would fit your bill if you could find a shop nearby selling it. They also told me they had citric acid for some other purpose. I'll be going back later to restock!
    Gary Beasley

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