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  1. #1

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    Ok its clear... I have no idea what I'm doing .: T-max developer :.

    I'm trying to learn how to develop my own black and white film, which I did in High school... but high school was 5 years ago.

    I started off buying Kodak D-11 developer. Oops. Its still sitting on my shelf waiting for a use to arise.

    I just some Kodak T-Max Developer, Indicator stop and polymax t-fixer locally on E-bay and placed a bid.

    Now what? From what I've read, this seems to be excatly what I need. But I've been searching around the internet, and I read somewhere that its only for certain types of films. I usually shoot Agfa 100/400.

    Can someone help me out here, I feel so lost.

  2. #2

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    T-Max developer is marketed for T-Max films, but it can be used with most B&W films, and is some peoples' preferred developer even for non-T-grain films. I've never used it, so I can't comment on its characteristics, either generally or with Agfa film. I'm also unfamiliar with Polymax T-Fixer. The developer and fixer are the two key ingredients you must have to develop B&W film, at least in a conventional sort of way. Indicator stop bath is useful but not required, as are hypo clear and Photo Flo. If I were you, I'd get some Photo Flo, and perhaps some hypo clear.

    Quite a few beginners' Web sites that summarize the steps required exist, but unfortunately, I lost my bookmarks recently, so I can't provide pointers to the ones I've used. :-( A Web search will turn them up, though.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loopy
    I'm trying to learn how to develop my own black and white film, which I did in High school... but high school was 5 years ago.

    I started off buying Kodak D-11 developer. Oops. Its still sitting on my shelf waiting for a use to arise.

    I just some Kodak T-Max Developer, Indicator stop and polymax t-fixer locally on E-bay and placed a bid.

    Now what? From what I've read, this seems to be excatly what I need. But I've been searching around the internet, and I read somewhere that its only for certain types of films. I usually shoot Agfa 100/400.

    Can someone help me out here, I feel so lost.
    Hi Loopy. Did you mean ID11? If so, you can't go far wrong with that. T max is a good choice as well, though it depends on what look/feel you are after. I like it with Agfa but prefer ID11 with most other films. Give the ID11 a run for a while so you have something to go by, then try the other. As to all things developing go to either http://www.about.com/ look under photography/developing or http://www.photogs.com/bwworld/bwresources.html or try Agfa, Ilford home page.

    Enjoy
    B.

  4. #4

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    Dear Loopy,

    It will all come back quickly.<g> Check the Ilford web site for a document called "Developing your first b&W film" or something like that. Check under products - b&w.

    Just to get you started:

    - Develop for the suggested time. According to the "Massive Development Chart" at digitaltruth.com, use 6-1/2 minutes for APX100 in T-Max developer diluted 1:4. There are times for a "new" and old APX400 so you'll just have to figure out which one you have.

    - Stop Bath: 30 seconds (continuous agitation). Mix it using the instructions on the bottle.

    - Mix the Polymax fixer to the conentration listed on the bottle for film. Fix for 5 minutes.

    A copy of the Kodak b&w darkroom dataguide is a nice thing to have as well.

    Neal Wydra

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loopy
    I'm trying to learn how to develop my own black and white film, which I did in High school... but high school was 5 years ago.

    I started off buying Kodak D-11 developer. Oops. Its still sitting on my shelf waiting for a use to arise.
    Kodak D-11 is a Metol/Hydroquinone Film Developer that uses Sodium Carbonate as the alkali.

    AFAIK Kodak has not marketed D-11 for some years. Sitting on the shelf in a sealed can, it should still be fine.

    As a starting point, try 4 minutes of development at 68 deg. F.

    D-11 can be diluted with an equal amount of water. In the diluted case try an initial starting point of 8 minutes at 68 deg. F.

    Small Tank agitation: 30 seconds of gentle agitation initially, followed by 10 seconds of gentle agitation every minute.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  6. #6

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    You certainly don't want to use the Kodak D-11 as this is intended to produce high contrast negatives. Since you are just starting out, buy a bottle of Kodak HC-110 since it can be used with any B&W film. This particular developer is economical and lasts forever. Go to the website www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110 for information on this developer and development times. When you have more experience you can experiment with other developers. Avoid the siren call of other developers since they are more restrictive in their use.

  7. #7

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    Thanks everyone, all the information you provided was a big help. I don't feel so lost anymore ^_^

    I won the bid last night, so I'll be at it tonight. Exciting.

    Thank you thank you ^_^

  8. #8

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    IMHO, if Loopy already has the T-Max developer, he might as well use it, unless somebody can give a specific reason why it's unsuitable for use with the Agfa films he has. Buying another developer, like HC110, would just be a waste of money, at least in the short term. In the long term, of course, Loopy might want to experiment with both developers.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    IMHO, if Loopy already has the T-Max developer, he might as well use it, unless somebody can give a specific reason why it's unsuitable for use with the Agfa films he has. Buying another developer, like HC110, would just be a waste of money, at least in the short term.
    Considering the cost and shelf life of Kodak's T-Max developer, it could be considered a waste to use it on ordinary (non T-Max) film.

  10. #10
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    I am just curious why loopy went down this rather complicated route for his re-introduction to developing?
    I would suggest a traditional emulsion film and an easy, bullet proof developer like Rodinal. You may want a different look later - but at least you are practically guaranteed a workable image.
    I'm just writing from the perspective of someone who still has his baby steps in this field fairly fresh in his mind - and I know that the simplicity was a nice touch. I never had to worry about depleted developer, used water for a stop bath and some Ilford Rapidfix, and had nice, printable negs that really let me learn a lot.
    Having said that - if you already have the developer on your shelf - hit digitaltruth.com, its easy and mostly spot on for most things - if you want a more subjective analysis, run a search here on APUG - I don't think a month goes by without a complete cycle of developer+film combos being discussed in terms of look, pushing ability, etc. Just shoot a lot and by the time the film starts to jump onto the reels by itself, you will have a pretty good idea what changes you may want to make and to what end. Good luck!

    Peter.

    PS. I feel pretty accomplished because I reached a stage where I am beginning to know what it is I don't know... so I know how you feel

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