Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,902   Posts: 1,521,162   Online: 1103
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    I have used acetic acid based stop bath for over twenty years and I have had none of the effects that some seem to indicate.

    Furthermore noted photographers, by that I mean those who can hang work on the walls, seem to consistantly indicate that they use stop bath. I am more inclined to accept their advice based in their direct experience then I would someone's hypothesis without direct experience.

  2. #22
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Coast, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    4,195
    Images
    15
    "Noted photographers", generally speaking, have been around for a long time and probably don't feel a need to change after all those years

    All I know is that because I'm using an all alkaline processing sequence I can go: 3 minutes development, 30 seconds water stop, 1 minute first TF-3, 1 minute second TF-3, then straight into the selenium toner. A HUGE savings in both time and materials. This has past the residual silver test and the residual hypo test after only a 20 minute wash.

    Murray

    (added later) I still wash fine prints for an hour anyways.
    Last edited by MurrayMinchin; 09-02-2005 at 11:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #23
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,622
    Images
    14
    Murray
    I am glad you added that little bit about the 1hr wash, I was wondering.

    ques, Why the all alkaline stages? with no acid stop
    are you using the hypoclear step?

    I as Don have been using an acid stop and was confinced it was a critical step in the sequence.

    my steps are 3min dev-30 second stop- non hardining fix one min-non harding fix one min- wash 1 min- hypoclear five min-selenium tone - wash 20-40 min standing washer.

    I believe this is close to the Ilford recommondations.

  4. #24
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Coast, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    4,195
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie
    Why the all alkaline stages? with no acid stop
    are you using the hypoclear step?
    Good morning Bob

    It was a couple months BIGI (before I got Internet) while reading the instruction label on a bottle of TF-4 (Photographer's Formulary Archival Rapid Fixer) that I had a revelation...I remembered Ansel saying in The Print that selenium toner requires an alkaline environment. So I began to wonder - why go: 3 minutes developer, 30 second acid stop bath, 3 minutes acid first fixer, a thorough wash, 3 minutes (alkaline) plain hypo, 3(ish) minutes selenium toner, 3 minutes hypo clearing agent, 1 hour wash? Why do acid at all?

    The old way, without even considering the first thorough wash, took 15 minutes...staying alkaline allows me to have a toned print (or test strip) in 8 minutes and 30 seconds.

    I found TF-3 at www.jackspcs.com and it was from The Film Developing Cookbook by Anchell and Troop where they state a hypo clearing agent is not required.

    Who knows...maybe in 99 years all my prints will spontaneously burst into flames but for now this is working for me.

    Murray
    Last edited by MurrayMinchin; 09-03-2005 at 10:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #25
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,622
    Images
    14
    Murray
    Thanks for the link, I know other workers in town who use the all alkaline route I will think about this further.
    As I stated earlier , I print a lot of lith and the acid stops the explosive development , basically you have a 5-10 second period to pull and stop the print or nfg.

  6. #26
    lee
    lee is offline
    lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth TX
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,913
    Images
    8
    as a silver printer I use citric acid as a stop bath helps make the smell of a darkroom a little bit better. however, for film processing I use water as a rinse btw dev and fix

    lee\c

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Acidification before an acid or neutral fix is said to reduce the potential for fixer stain and formation of dichroic fog in some fixers.

    If you use an acid hardener fix, you can precipitate the alum out of the fixer onto your film or paper by going from developer to water to fix. The alum is difficult if not impossible to remove and can be seen as a white crust or sheen on negatives or prints. So, a stop bath is really a good idea with acid hardening fixes.

    It has also been shown that uniformity in negatives and prints is somewhat better when a stop bath is used after the developer. The best example illustrating that is with the RA paper example above. Uniformity is best with a stop after development and before the blix. On large prints and LF or MF negatives, you can often see nonuniformities, streaks or mottle in large areas of uniform density.


    PE

    For several years I used a plain water stop bath with films but switched back to an acid stop bath after noticing the fixer stain or dichroic fog that PE mentions. This did not happen with all films but the fact that it happened once with some 10-15 sheets of 12X20 film convinced me that the water bath was just more trouble than it was worth. And since I switched back to the acid stop bath I have not had any more dichroic fog.

    Sandy

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin