Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,301   Posts: 1,536,125   Online: 849
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25
  1. #11
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,651
    Images
    14
    Loopy
    With film you will open a whole can of woopa.. without stopping the development . Maybe it is just me but I can see no reason for you not using a acid stop bath, you are just asking for trouble.
    Some problems are not apparent at the contact stage and if you shoot, develop , contact for a period of time and then decide to make some enlargements you may be in for a terrible surprise.
    I see this all the time with clients coming to me with film processed at other labs in the city and when I go to larger size all the problems become evident.
    Sorry buddy but use a stop and save yourself some argro.
    Bob

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Quote Originally Posted by Loopy
    So I attempted to develope my own film today.

    I developed old Agfa 400, in Kodak T-max developer (7 min) Stopped with water for about 3 minutes and fixed for 5 minutes.
    I've always used an acid stop bath, but Grimm (The Basic Darkroom Book, 3rd Edition, 1999) recommends "at least two complete changes of water in the tank within 30 to 60 seconds" for water stops.

    Also it looks as if it was unevenly developed, for one half seemed darker than the other.
    How is this unevenness distributed? For instance, are early frames darker than late frames, late frames darker than early frames, or does the darkness vary from top to bottom (in landscape orientation) within all frames? In the last case, I'd agree with others who suggested you might not be using enough chemistry. (How much did you use and in what type of tank? Stainless steel tanks generally take 250ml for one 35mm roll, while plastic tanks usually take 300-400ml per 35mm roll.) If the density changes with the position in the roll, my first guess would be that it's a matter of film exposure rather than development. Check the darkness of the frame numbers and other markings on the film; if they look to be the same across the entire roll, then that supports the hypothesis that you're seeing exposure (or subject) differences.

    So I tested another roll. This one I developed at 7 minutes, stopped with water for about 3 and fixed for 10 minutes.
    A critical quote appears out of order:

    Also while processing , the first roll I would turn the tank upside down to agitate it, like instructed in the Ilford guide I found. I thought this might contribute to the uneven developement, so while processing the second roll I turned the little dohicky in the tank, like I remember doing in school.
    This roll didn't turn out at all. White runs along the entire film, you can barely make out images, and half of it is just black.
    I think the change to your agitation routine may be to blame here. Agitating by rotating the central rod is likely to set up currents that will cause uneven development and/or fixing. (Or so I hear; I've never actually tried this agitation method.) The advice I've seen is that if you must agitate in this way, you should combine it with horizontal movement -- sliding the tank back and forth a couple of feet on the tabletop. In theory, this should dampen the regular circular movement of fluids and improve the evenness of development.

  3. #13
    Craig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    779
    Images
    39
    This sounds like it might be fogging, is your darkroom completly dark when you are loading the film? Try turning out the lights and sit there for 15 min. If you can see anything it not dark enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by Loopy

    This roll didn't turn out at all. White runs along the entire film, you can barely make out images, and half of it is just black.

  4. #14
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    When you say half is black, do you mean half the length of the roll or half of the height of the roll? If half the height then you did not have enough chemicals in the tank or, if the tank holds more than one reel, the single reel may have slipped up the centre column when you inverted.

    The white translucency sounds like under fixing to me, but you have so many other things going on, it's difficult to tell, and given you fixed for 10 minutes it does not seem likely...

    Any chance of a scan? It's easer to diagnose when you can see what's there.


    Cheers, Bob.

  5. #15
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,245
    Images
    296
    It sounds like to me that there wasn't enough developer to start out with. Perhaps the spool inside the tank moved up the column during the process and the film didn't get sufficiently soaked in the chemistry? This has happened to me a couple of times, and then I decided to just fill the tank all the way up every time I develop film, and no more problem.
    If you had half the film white, and half black, I assume the black/white divides the film in the long dimension, along the whole stretch of the roll.
    So to sum up, it sounds like partial underdevelopment in your first attempt but proper fixing, and it sounds like partial underfixing in your second attempt but proper development.

    You can use either an acid stop bath, or a plain water stop bath. Both are acceptable methods. If you use an acid fixer, you're likely better off with acid stop bath, so you don't neutralize the pH of the fixer since developers are alkaline. If you use an alkaline fixer, a water stop bath might be preferred, or the acid stop bath would neutralize the fixer pH as well. But as long as you're careful and test your fixer with a piece of scrap film every time you use it, none of the above should matter much.

    Hope that helps,

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #16
    raucousimages's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Salt Lake
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    825
    It sounds like your tank is for two rolls but you are developing one roll with just enough chemistry to cover that roll. If this is correct as you invert the tank you will produce bubbles in the tank leaving the top half of the roll under-developed. I learned this the hard way on some negs I can never shoot again. Always fill the tank with developer even if you only have one roll of film.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    20
    Thanks to everyone for such great help.

    Tonight I tried to process another film, and by using your advice I was able to make a idiot-proof list of instructions for myself.

    And I'm happy to say it was a success!!!

    I think I went wrong with a couple places. Mainly the amount of chemicals used, combined with the sliding of the roll on the spool. I did some testing with water and found that it slide up quite easily when I flipped it.

    I also think my stop timing had something to do with it. I cut it down to just over 30 seconds.

    Everything worked out great, and I can't thank all of you enough!

    Well I have about 5 rolls of undeveloped film that need developing so I'm off.

    Thanks!

    Cheers,
    Loopy (Jen)

  8. #18
    gnashings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,376
    Images
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Loopy
    ... Mainly the amount of chemicals used, combined with the sliding of the roll on the spool. I did some testing with water and found that it slide up quite easily when I flipped it.
    It is my humble opinion that there in lies 99.99% of your problem. It something that does happen when inverting - especially if you are being frugal with the chemicals.

    As to a couple of the other points brought up - just to reinforce the points:

    a) I have learned processing with water as stop, and usually use two changes of water (as much as will fit in the tank - more volume is better in this case, and hey - its almost free!), time= 30-45 sec. Never had any issues with a multitude of developers and almost every film available in stores.

    b) I have used several agitation techniques with a paterson tank. I gave up on inversions... well, because I develop in my kitchen and those "spill proof" lids really eran the parentheses... I have used the rod to rotate, and I have used a swirling motion (like swirling ice cubes in a drink) when I felt gentler agitation was called for. I have yet to have a unevenly developed negative - both 120 and 35mm.

    Of course, as a relative beginner, I am just conveying to you my experiences and the only reason I don't try everything else suggested (re agitation and stop bath) is that I feel more confident in my limited abilities when not "fixing what aint broke" and maintaining as few variables as possible, so that I can concentrate on evaluating any ohter changes I make.

    I am very glad you finally had success - I am sure you will have many a success!

    Cheers,

    Peter.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie
    Maybe it is just me but I can see no reason for
    you not using a acid stop bath, ...
    MAYBE! Some see no reason for a stop of any sort
    given their way of processing. A few have and do mix
    the fix with the developer.

    There is though a reason to use an acid stop. If the
    fix is an acid fix the quick rinse in an acid stop will
    maintain the acidity of the fix.

    I don't worry as much as some. As you know I use
    chemistry once but very dilute so as not to waste.
    The next roll or print has fresh clean solutions in
    which to do it's processing. Dan

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Plymouth. UK.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,401
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Loopy
    So I attempted to develope my own film today.

    I developed old Agfa 400, in Kodak T-max developer (7 min) Stopped with water for about 3 minutes and fixed for 5 minutes.

    My film turned out, but there was still a bit of coating (?) on it, so I'm assuming I didn't fix it for long enough. Also it looks as if it was unevenly developed, for one half seemed darker than the other.

    So I tested another roll. This one I developed at 7 minutes, stopped with water for about 3 and fixed for 10 minutes.

    This roll didn't turn out at all. White runs along the entire film, you can barely make out images, and half of it is just black.

    The only thing I did differently was the time change in the fix. I have no idea how old these rolls are, my assumption is over 3 years. Also while processing , the first roll I would turn the tank upside down to agitate it, like instructed in the Ilford guide I found. I thought this might contribute to the uneven developement, so while processing the second roll I turned the little dohicky in the tank, like I remember doing in school.

    Anyways, I'm curious as to what I did so wrong on the second roll. I hope this makes sense, and thanks in advance.

    Cheers,
    Loopy
    What was the recommended use by date on the film package?

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin