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  1. #1

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    Acutance Developer 8x10

    What would be a good "Non Pyro" acutance developer for 8x10 contact printing? I use TXP 320 but would be open to other suggestions.
    Thanks for your help.
    Last edited by bobbysandstrom; 09-04-2005 at 12:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    Dilute Rodinal stand or semi-stand developed would be one of my choices in a non-staining, non tanning developer. Other choices would be one of the Ascorbate/Phenidone developers (like Xtol, DS-10 etc.) or Ascorbate/Metol developers(DS-12, Mytol, etc) . Then, there is always Neofin Blau (probably Metol) and/or Agfa 8 (Glycin).

    When you restrict the developers to non-pyro, that rules out a lot of developers (pyrogallol, hydroquinone and catechol to name a few).
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #3

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    D-23 does pretty well. Strangely enough, it has very pronounced acutance behavior and is semi-compensating. The main complaint is its high sulfite content. If you are unhappy with the results of using it straight, try it at 1:3 (with about double the developing time). Most any of the acutance developers you would use for 35mm will perform the same way with 8X10. That opens up a whole pile of packaged products. You are not so concerned with grain at 8X10, so one of the staining developers could be very good. Try PMK of Pyrocat-HD.

  4. #4

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    D-76, X-Tol, and even Microdol-X, all 1+3 will give you sharp negs.

  5. #5

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    I have had good results with FX-1 (Photog’s Formulary), dilute Rodinal (Adorama), Calbe R09 and Neofin Blau (J and C) and similar high-acutance formulae.

    My overwhelming favorite since 1967 and also highly recommended as the gold standard by Leica is Ethol T.E.C. 4-ounce liquid now available from Freestyle. Dilute it 1:15 and just watch the magic!

    These chemicals seem to show the most pronounced effect with 400 speed conventional-emulsion films. In contrast, my experience indicates that heroic high-acutance concoctions have less dramatic results with slow modern emulsions like 100 Delta. Especially in LF.

    By the way, Microdol, while a superb developer, is not a high-acutance formula. Quite the opposite, in fact.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Cook

    By the way, Microdol, while a superb developer, is not a high-acutance formula. Quite the opposite, in fact.

    If it's diluted, in can be.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysandstrom
    What would be a good "Non Pyro" accutance developer for 8x10 contact printing? I use TXP 320 but would be open to other suggestions.
    Thanks for your help.
    Acutance tends to be much more noticable with 35mm rather than larger formats, by the time you get to 6x9 medium format, any differences are hardly noticable at all. Grain is hardly a problem when enlarging 4x5 negatives and none at all when contact printing, especially a 10x8 negative, the most important thing is to get the exposure and development right.
    Developers such as D-76, ID11, Xtol, DK-50, Rodinal etc should prove to be entirely satisfactory.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard
    D-76, X-Tol, and even Microdol-X, all 1+3 will give you sharp negs.
    D-76 contains hydroquinone and is thus a pyro family developer.

    Xtol is an acutance developer.

    Microdol-X is not an acutance developer.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  9. #9
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    I like highly dilute HC-110 (Dilution G, 1:119 from syrup) and reduced agitation. You may not see much difference, in 8x10, from more common dilutions and agitation schemes, however; my experience has been that the best effect is seen with enlargement factors around 4x, as with an 8x10 from a 6x9 cm negative. Less enlargement and the adjacency effects aren't really visible; more, and they quickly become obtrusive.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    D-76 contains hydroquinone and is thus a pyro family developer.
    Yes, but you'll play heck getting it to stain with that much sulfite. If you mix your own D-76, try sometime keeping all concentrations but sulfite by the book, but reduce sulfite to 10 grams or less per liter instead of 100. This will be an experiment, so don't use it on a once-in-a-lifetime shot on LF film.
    Gadget Gainer

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