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Thread: Bulk Loader

  1. #11
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    I'm not Ronald, but the fear/complaint I've seen is that they tend to collect dust, which in turn causes scratches. This isn't normally a big deal with film cassettes, which are used a limited number of times; but felt in a bulk loader is likely to see thousands of feet of film pass through it, increasing the risk -- or so goes the claim. Neither of my two bulk loaders uses a felt light trap, so I can't comment from personal experience.
    Sometimes,

    I fear that we fear to much, I have been using them for 20+ years and cannot attribute any scratches to my bulk loaders, if you practise good clean methods, I don't think you have to worry about a felt light trap any more than you do with any other light trap on a piece of photographic equipment. Sometimes, I think we attribute problems to the equipment, when in actuality it may be due to what we do.

    Dave

  2. #12
    josephaustin's Avatar
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    Sometimes, I think we attribute problems to the equipment, when in actuality it may be due to what we do.

    This could be a factor in the scratched negs I have. However I bought my Loyds second hand and I fear that to be a larger factor. I keep all my loaders in Ziplock bags, if they have film in them in the fridge. How this loader was treated before I bought it is beyond me. However the Film that passes through it usually is scratched in the center by what could only be the loader, since it happens in different cameras, and cassettes.

  3. #13
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by josephaustin
    This could be a factor in the scratched negs I have. However I bought my Loyds second hand and I fear that to be a larger factor. I keep all my loaders in Ziplock bags, if they have film in them in the fridge. How this loader was treated before I bought it is beyond me. However the Film that passes through it usually is scratched in the center by what could only be the loader, since it happens in different cameras, and cassettes.
    You may be right, but I have always had a practise of making sure my equipment is clean before I use it, when I purchase something used, I go through it with a fine tooth come to make sure that everything I can possibly make clean is clean, if the piece of equipment you purchase is not cleaned by you and you personally, then how can you ever trust it, the biggest responsibility to make sure your photography is clean, lies with you and you only..

    Dave

  4. #14
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    The AP/Adorama opens a gate once the crank is inserted through the closed cover. Then the door can not be opened until the crank is removed and the gate is closed. A pretty clever, foolproof (me-proof) design that eliminates the problems associated with the Watson and Lloyds designs. When I wind a 35 exposure roll, I get 35 frames with just enough clear area before and after to be comfortable. It was an unknown quantity when I bought it, but I am very happy with the choice.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  5. #15

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    As an aside one of the loaders I have is a British Fulfix- it even opens and closes Leica metal cassettes. Are they still made?
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    The AP/Adorama opens a gate once the crank is inserted through the closed cover. Then the door can not be opened until the crank is removed and the gate is closed. A pretty clever, foolproof (me-proof) design that eliminates the problems associated with the Watson and Lloyds designs. When I wind a 35 exposure roll, I get 35 frames with just enough clear area before and after to be comfortable. It was an unknown quantity when I bought it, but I am very happy with the choice.
    Hi Flotsam. Using your reply to thank all replies so far. Still hoping to UK user replies but it sounds as if the AP Bobinquick is going to be OK. Nice tip in the replies about using a post-it note to clean the felt light trap. There are plenty of secondhand Watsons around but not much cheaper than new AP Bobinquicks and when it comes to rolls of film and secondhand loaders then light leaks worry me.

    Flotsam. Your point about just enough clear area was interesting. Obviously when you load the film into the spool by taping the end to it, you must expose a few inches in the light which is fogged. How do you stop that being used to take photos by mistake. On a shop bought pre-loaded cassette , my Pentax MZ7 automatically rewinds the film after taking the 24/25th or 36/37th exposure. When I develop it there is always a few inches blank to spare on which there are no exposures. Is the rewind triggered by the camera detecting the sudden tension in the film created by the film reaching the end of the spool?

    However if it works this way, it suggests that in a bulk loaded film by the time it has reached the end of the spool enough will have come out for some of the fogged film to present itself for exposure so I'll end up taking photos on fogged film. OR does the loader somehow allow for this and wind into the cassette enough fogged film so that when I get to say 12 if I have loaded 12 there is enough unfogged film left to avoid exposure on already fogged film. Presumably if I forgot how much I had loaded and relied on the tension to trigger the rewind I could have taken maybe two shots, say up to 14 on fogged film?

    I hope I have been able to explain properly what I mean.

    Thanks

  7. #17
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Yes, you make perfect sense.
    The Watson exposes a fairly long piece of the tail of the film. If you are like me and shoot until you feel tension on the film, it is then that you realize that the last one or two frames that you shot are ruined. The Lloyds only forces you pull a short amount of film to attach it to the spool but some people are leery about the felt light trap that they use.
    The AP gives the best of both worlds. An open gate and a very short length of exposed film at the spool. I wind until the lever won't throw anymore and never lose the last frame on the roll. There is a half inch or so of clear film between the last frame and the exposed end. Just pull out the absolute minimum needed to tape the film to the spool.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  8. #18

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    I, too, have a Lloyd and a couple of Watsons. I've had the Lloyd for over 40 years, and its felt light trap is still good. I actually prefer the Lloyd loader to the Watson. It's simpler, and it usually works better. Film length is determined by counting turns, however, and that may be inaccurate with some films. On the other hand, the frame counter on the Watson often doesn't work either.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser
    On a shop bought pre-loaded cassette , my Pentax MZ7 automatically rewinds the film after taking the 24/25th or 36/37th exposure. When I develop it there is always a few inches blank to spare on which there are no exposures. Is the rewind triggered by the camera detecting the sudden tension in the film created by the film reaching the end of the spool?
    I'm not familiar with your camera, but my guess would be that it reads the film roll length from the DX code on the cartridge and automatically rewinds at the appropriate point. If so, you'll have to be extra careful about the bulk loading cartridges you use to be sure they match not just the DX speed but also the length of the roll. You may have to buy DX-coded bulk-load cartridges and then modify the DX coding for the roll length. I suggest you peruse your camera's manual or otherwise research this issue. Perhaps I'm wrong or perhaps there's some way to disable this feature and have the camera not rewind until it detects the tension at the end of the roll.

    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser
    However if it works this way, it suggests that in a bulk loaded film by the time it has reached the end of the spool enough will have come out for some of the fogged film to present itself for exposure so I'll end up taking photos on fogged film.
    As others have said, bulk loaders, when used in regular room light, expose a certain amount of the end of a roll. If you're careful and lucky, you might not lose any exposures to this; however, if you pull out lots of film when attaching it to the spool or if you're unlucky in terms of where the frames happen to fall, you'll lose at least one shot at the end of the roll.

    It's possible to use a bulk loader in total darkness, in which case you won't have this problem. Even just attaching the film to the spool, putting the spool in the cartridge, putting the cartridge in the loader, and closing the door on the loader will be enough. You can then turn on the lights if you like, crank away, turn out the lights (for the benefit of the next roll), open the loader, cut the film, close the loader, and turn on the lights. You can then trim the film, label the cartridge, etc. in full light. That's a lot of mucking about with light switches, but it's do-able, at least with conventional bulk-load cartridges. I've not tried this with re-used prepackaged film cartridges (which you can get free from any friendly 1-hour lab); aligning the two film ends and taping them together is something I'd expect to be too hard in total darkness.

  10. #20

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    What do Jessops sell theirs for? I seem to recall being struck by how expensive it was.

    I have three, variously a Watson and two Computrols (which are Watson clones, it seems to me), the cheapest of which cost me 99p and the most expensive a fiver. Eb*y is the place to be for these things.

    My only gripe is the length of film that gets exposed at the end of the roll (where you tape to the core of the cassette). It required me to change my habit from shooting to the bitter end, to stopping at the number of frames I loaded. No big deal.

    And certainly for me bulk-loading is the way forward.

    It would be even better if I could find any Neopan 400 left in bulk, but it appears to be all gone.

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