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  1. #1

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    FineGrain asa 400?

    Is there such thing as a fine-grain 400 speed film?

    HP5+ sure ain't it. An 8x10 enlargement on it gave me grain the size of Volkswagens.

    I've got a can of Foma 400 (Freestyle arista.edu ultra, actually) and wouldn't mind buying some others to try, but if I'm completely barking up the wrong tree, no need to bother.

    Ultimately, I'd like to find something with the creamy smooth grain of PanF+ in a higher speed film.

  2. #2
    titrisol's Avatar
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    Neopan 400 in DDX is as fine grained as Efke 100

    Me guesses that it'll be the same in Xtol or Tmax
    Mama took my APX away.....

  3. #3
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    Larger format is one solution. FP4 or another slower film is another.

    That said, I know of several Master's thesis shows where people used HP5 and enlarged to 20x24 without serious grain problems. I have often gone to 11x14 without grain issues.

    Mike

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmdavis
    That said, I know of several Master's thesis shows where people used HP5 and enlarged to 20x24 without serious grain problems. I have often gone to 11x14 without grain issues. Mike
    Excellent. What developer are you using? I've been using Sprint lately, but am very comfortable using Ilfosol-S or D76 1:1, too. I haven't had much luck with Rodinal.

  5. #5
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    I have neither expertise nor experience on this subject, but what about a 200 speed film in a compensating developer like Diafine?

  6. #6

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    How about some of the C-41 dev films like Kodak t400cn and XP-2 and the Fuji one. I'm impressed with Kodak's, its very smooth, and tonally a bit like a pyro neg. Rated at around 320 its a no-grainer.

  7. #7
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    Usually Ilfosol-S. 7minutes maybe 7.5

    What developer are you currently using?

    Mike

  8. #8
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    If you want finest grain then you have to use a fine grain developer. Look at Ilford's recommended developers for fine grain with HP5+: DDX & Perceptol.

    Rodinal & Ilfosol S are sharp but inevitably grainy. Developers such as D-76 at 1+1 are neither one nor t'other.

    Cheers, Bob.

  9. #9
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    I have found the latest iteration of Tri-X developed in Rodinal to be remarkably fine grained. 10x15's look like my medium format prints from 20 years ago. It's cheap and easy, two of my favorite adjectives.

  10. #10

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    I'll second Richard Littlewood's suggestion; the chromogenic B&W films produce finer grain than the conventional ISO 400 B&W films, at least in my subjective judgment. Kodak's has an orange color mask that will definitely increase exposure times when printing conventionally and may require some odd filtrations if you print on VC paper. Ilford's lacks this orange color mask, although the negatives have a bit of a purple cast to them (much like some conventional B&W films when they're slightly under-fixed). I believe Konica's also has an orange mask, but I've never used it myself. I have no idea about Fuji's.

    If chromogenic films are unacceptable for some reason, you might try Fomapan 200. This is reportedly a T-grain film, and is less grainy than any ISO 400 film I've tried, but of course it's also not as fast. Fomapan 400 is reportedly NOT a T-grain film, so don't judge the 200 based on what you see when you develop the 400.

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