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  1. #1
    Rlibersky's Avatar
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    Edwal 111 Print Developer

    I have an oppurtunity to buy 10 cans of this developer. I have not been able to find any information on this formula. It is from the 50's.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2

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    First I'd look at the labels, they may give you some hints as to their composition and intended use. Then I'd ask for a better price.

  3. #3

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    Said to produce true black tones with excellent contrast. Dilute 1+7 for bromide papers, 1+5 for fast chlorobromide papers (Kodabromide) and 1+4 for slow chlorobromide papers and contact papers.
    Normal development time is 1½ to 3 minutes at 20°C. Best black tones are
    obtained with a development time of 2 minutes or more.

    Distilled water (50°C) ................. 750 ml
    Metol .................................. 5.0 g
    Sodium sulfite (anhy) .................. 80.0 g
    Glycin ................................. 6.0 g
    Chlorohydroquinone ..................... 15.0 g
    Potassium carbonate .................... 120 g
    Potassium bromide ...................... 3.0 g
    Distilled water to make ................ 1.0 l

    Modern Developing Methods, 3rd Edition (March 1946), The Edwal Laboratories, p 72.

  4. #4
    Rlibersky's Avatar
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    Wow I wish I had one of these books. Looks like a standard formula, with Glycin added. Which, come to think of it, makes this unusual.

    What effect does this have on paper?
    Is Chlorohydroquinone the same as Hydroquinone?

  5. #5

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    Chlorohydroquinone is a slow, powerful developer similar to hydroquinone, but
    more energetic having seven times the reducing power of the latter and being
    less sensitive to bromide ion. It is also less effected by temperature than
    hydroquinone and produces less fog. It is, however, more toxic than hydroquinone.

    Chlorohydroquinone is very difficult to obtain and is not stocked by the companies that sell photochemicals.

  6. #6
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    Ed Lowe said this was his favorite developer: it will be similar to Ansco 130, but more versatile. Expect, if you put the work into it, that you'll have something here worth the trouble. From the glory days before all developers were the same.

    C-HQ

    Similar to HQ, but less tendency to fog. It was used in paper developers for this reason, allowing lots of control without loading up the formula with restrainer. Lowe didn't feel there was much advantage in a film developer.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  7. #7
    Rlibersky's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. I think I'll see if it is something that won't cost much. I assuming that being in air tight cans it should be ok..?

  8. #8

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    I wouldn't pay a lot for this stuff; after all, 50 years is a long time to sit around on your...here it comes...can . It could be still be good however.

    According to Anchell, C-HQ is not only dangerous to produce, it's also expensive. That's probably why we don't see it anymore.

  9. #9
    Rlibersky's Avatar
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    I talked to the owner of this developer and alot of old paper. It is a jack pot of darkroom stuff. She said they were cleaning out a building that they bought. At the back of a room that they couldn't get to before was another room. It was full of paper from the 40's, 50's, and 60's. Mostly Velox and Kodabromide. 65 packs all together. Half never opened. In a basement vegtable cellar in the vegas area. I assume pretty arid.

    The most interesting is a Kodak Chloride type 1X, 250 Sheets 10x10. The chemicals are all in cans that have not been opened. I wouldn't pay to much for the chemicals. I told her I'd but them all. The shipping is going to cost, more then she wanted for the paper.

  10. #10

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    Chemicals in cans should be OK since they were packed under nitrogen and unless the can is rusted through should still be good.

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