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  1. #1
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Kodak Plus-X B&W reversal *slide* film - how to process ???

    Hi,

    I have recently obtained a large amount (20,000 feet) of Kodak Plus-X B&W reversal slide film ... (50 ASA)

    I can have it cross processed into negative at the lab but it is an expensive process for them as it is so uncommon - the neg also has a lot more grain than the film would if it were regularly processed into slide ...

    Does anyone know the process for B&W slide ? either cross-processed (C41 ??) or standard (E6 ??) or ??


    Another issue tho not as important is that it is actually 16mm film (7276 for you cine types) I have to make a damn large dev tank to take maybe up to 100 feet at a time ... no sprocketed immersion system for me...

    I plan to make lay down cut segments of it to make contact prints and enlargements of sequences of motion from it via a 16mm camera ...

    just trying to cut down the costs and hopefully learn something as well


    cheers!
    nick
    Last edited by nick mulder; 10-15-2005 at 01:18 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: got me info wrong

  2. #2
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Check out dr5.com. Maybe they could help but i don't think they'll give you their recipe. I've got a 16&35mm 100ft developing tank made by Morse. If it doesn't come with directions let me know. They're old but they are sometimes on ebay and i saw a guy selling one on photo.net earlier this year.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #3
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill
    Check out dr5.com. Maybe they could help but i don't think they'll give you their recipe. I've got a 16&35mm 100ft developing tank made by Morse. If it doesn't come with directions let me know. They're old but they are sometimes on ebay and i saw a guy selling one on photo.net earlier this year.
    Interesting site that one...

    I mistakenly put listed my film as Tri-x - which it isn't, its Plus-X - which is already a +ve film - so i wonder what dr5 would give me, a +ve or neg...

    In the tested films section of the site the 7276 logo is there but I get a 404 error on the link - I've emailed them to see whats up ...

    cheers,
    nick


    ps to others who may be reading >> still interested also in doing this myself, any ideas ? (;

  4. #4

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    Dear Nick,

    While you've probably seen this: http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/pr...12.4&lc=en#H09

    There is a reasonable description of b&w reversal prcess and recipies in the Jan/Feb 2002 issue of Photo Techniques.

    Neal Wydra

  5. #5

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    Dear Nick,

    While you've probably seen this: http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/pr...12.4&lc=en#H09

    There is a reasonable description of b&w reversal prcess and recipies in the Jan/Feb 2002 issue of Photo Techniques.

    Neal Wydra

  6. #6

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    Please excuse the double post, I have not idea how that happened.

  7. #7
    cvik's Avatar
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    All black and white film create a negative image. Even Scala is a black and white negative film (probably APX100 but with a clear base). All black and white films, except the chromogenic ones, can be developed into a postive.

    The process is simply to develop it as a negative with your normal b&w developer, bleach/clear, re-expose the whole film (chemically or by light), and develop the new exposed areas.

    There are many variations but all boils down to the same procedure. Some use light, some use chemicals, some variations in bleach/clear-baths... First developer is chosen based on what look you want, second developer will typically be a paper developer as it develops the whole image faster (everything not exposed is bleached already...). You may have normal roomlight on after you've cleared the image. The rest is to be exposed completly and developed anyway.

    Let me know if you want papers and instructions on how to do it.

    Christian

  8. #8

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    See the Kodak web site under motion picture products for information about processing Plus-X Reversal film. The process is similar to that used to reversal process Tmax-100. I think Plus-X Reversal is still an active product, but I'm not sure.

    Reversal films can be processed to a negative, but you may be disappointed with the results. Speed is usually a bit slower (1/2 to 1 stop, possibly), and grain may be a bit larger. Some years ago I got some DuPont movie film that I processed to negatives, and I had problems with blocked highlights. You will need to experiment to find the right film speed and development time (and, maybe, developer).

    Reversal movie films are optimized for reversal processing and are slightly but significantly different from negative films. Movie films also generally have finer grain but somewhat lower sharpness than their still film counterparts.

  9. #9
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Last time I looked (a couple months ago) Plus-X Reversal, Tri-X Reversal, and Double-X Negative were all still available in 16 mm single perf, a couple different spool and winding options.

    Just one quick thing from the top of the thread -- do NOT put any B&W silver image material into C-41 or E-6; you'll get back blank film, possibly accompanied by a punch in the nose from the guy who has to clean the sloughed emulsion out of the machinery (the emulsion might stay on, but at 100 F, who can say for sure?).

    Also, FWIW, chromogenic films can be reversed, but the only chromogenic B&W that's worth bothering is XP-2 Super; the others all have the orange mask and won't make good slides at all -- to reverse, develop first in common B&W developer (treat it like Tri-X and push one stop); DO NOT FIX. Then expose to light and process through standard C-41 process to yield a dye image positive. If you're actually trying to get quality slides this way, rather than just see what it looks like, you'll probably need to adjust your EI when exposing and likely also fine tune the first development some.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  10. #10

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    7276 is Plus-X reversal. Kodak changed the emulsion a couple of years ago and the new Plus-X stock is called 7265. I just bought 400 feet of 7265 to film test my recently acquired Auricon Pro-600 camera. I wish I could get my hands on 20,000 feet of single perf 16mm 7276 or 7265 for a good price... It is a lovely cine film. There is also a Tri-X reversal, 7278 is the old one, 7266 is the new Tri-X. Here is some general info on the Kodak black and white reversal films. And yes, these are current reversal cine film emulsions that are readily available in Super 8 and 16mm.

    Anyway, I process Plus-X reversal film all the time since that happens to be my favorite b&w cine film. If you expose it at 50 ASA, use the Kodak D-94 / R-9 / D-95 process. If you expose it at 100 ASA, use Kodak D-94A / R-10 / D-95 process. You mix these from bulk chemicals. The formulas and procedures for the current D-94A / R-10 / D-95 are in the Kodak H-24 Processing Modules, Module 15. I can't find the older version of Module 15 that listed D-94 and R-9 formulas, but I'll list them for you in a subsequent post. The main differences are in the first developer and the bleach. The R-9 bleach uses potassium dichromate, and the R-10 bleach is a permanganate type.

    The easiest way to process this film is in the Russian Lomo spiral reel tank, which you can find on Ebay. Or you can usually get one from Olexandr Kalynychenko at Russian cine and photo cameras. There are several different Lomo spiral reel tanks, so make sure it is the one that processes 2x8mm, 2x16mm, or 1x35mm in 50 foot sections. You can process two 50 foot sections of film in about 2 liters of solutions.

    I'll post the D-94 / R-9 formulas for you.

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