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  1. #1
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Glycin... fresh glycin... what developers to make with it?

    I just got 100 grams of fresh glycin from Photographer's Formulary. I plan to make up about 5 litres of Ansco 130 stock solution. That leaves me with 45 grams of glycin and it deteriorates by the day...

    So... are there any other good formulas that use glycin? Let me know your experiences. I have a good opportunity to experiment.

  2. #2

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    There may be some recipes here on apug, or grab a copy of Anchell's "Darkroom Cookbook"; quite a few in there.

    Don't worry, your glycin won't go bad THAT fast.

  3. #3
    clay's Avatar
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    Mortensen's Glycin variant film developer for use with his '7-D' approach:
    Mortensen Glycin Variant:

    water 750 ml
    sodium sulfite 19 g
    Glycin 4 g
    sodium carbonate 19 g
    water to make 1000 ml

    Soft working fine grain developer. He used it to develop negatives to gamma infinity - so about 2 hours or so for any film. This will work if you place your highlights on Zone V, and don't sweat the shadows. More reasonable would be Tri-X for 12m at 70 degrees. YMMV. This is amazingly sharp and fine grained. Really rocks with that old Verichrome you've been hoarding. Plus-X isn't too bad either.

  4. #4

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    Make a phenidone version of 130

  5. #5
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    You could try the Adams version of 130 (http://www.jackspcs.com/pd130a.htm).

    Cheers, Bob.

  6. #6

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    Make a phenidone Adams version.

  7. #7
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Harvey's 777, breakfast of champions. (But you'll need p-phenylenediamine and metol, too.)

  8. #8
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Call me a stick in the mud, but if you're setting off to mix up something new, try some tried and true formulae, and see what they do before venturing off into the unknown.

    Bill Troop calls FX-2 the finest glycin formula ever. I'd offer MHO that Troop was making an understatement. It is simple, spectacular, has no bad habits. The one unusual ingredient ( pinakryptol yellow ) can be left out and nobody will no the difference. Check out The Film Developing Cookbook.

    AS for Ansco 130, it is undeservedly in the background in these days of Amidol passion. Imagine a developer with all the magic of Amidol without a prima donna's temperament and you get 130. My standard developer is the Adams variation in tandem with the Adams second bath, with carbonate and HQ. But I've always liked 2 bath developers, and shoot a lot of pictures with really long scales. Begin with 130, and see what you can do with it.

    Glycin developers can turn black and still be a perfectly viable developer. Have a good time with it.

    And have no fear about using the glycin in a hurry: it may turn dark, but still is fine.

    HINT: When mixing the 130, add the glycin BEFORE the carbonate. Mix it as well as you can, then add a little carbonate at a time until the glycin disolves. It will be pretty easy.

    Second HINT: Get a mortar and pestle. Use it to smush up the inevitable chunks of glycin before you mix the developer. It helps.

    have fun

    .
    Last edited by df cardwell; 10-22-2005 at 09:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  9. #9
    cvik's Avatar
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    From http://www.jackspcs.com/chemdesc.htm

    GLYCIN
    Photographic Formulas: FX-2 Film Developer, FX-11 Film Developer, Raphaelson GPQ Liquid Concentrate, Print Developer 106, Print Developer 130 Adams Version, Kodak D-155 Print Developer, WW-1 Print Developer

  10. #10
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Want a softer soup with less "snap & sizzle" than Ansco 130? The following has the same effect as Ansco 120, but with the longevity and unique qualities of a Glycin developer, it's what I call:

    12/15 Developer

    Hot tap water................................750 ml
    Metol...........................................12 grams
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)...............36 grams
    Sodium Carbonate (anhydrous)..........30 grams
    Potasium Bromide (10% solution)........15 cc
    Glycin............................................ 15 grams
    Water to make.................................1 litre

    I also add 15 ml Benzotriazole in a 2% solution to 1 litre of stock solution.

    A good starting point would be to dilute 1:3 and develop for 3 minutes @ 72 degrees. Don't be dismayed when nothing appears on the paper for almost a full minute, and looks like a piece of mushy crap at 2 minutes...that's when the magic starts to happen

    I've read that glycin print developers are unique in that increasing a prints development time has minimal effect on the light print values, while lowering the dark values; 12/15 does this for sure. While it does match Ansco 120, it is capable of deep, deep blacks.

    I keep my stock and working solutions in aluminized plastic wine bags, the kind with the removable brown spigot. The stock solution is good for at least a year, and the working solution keeps going for month after month after month...although I don't get in the darkroom to print very often

    I think commercial makers of developers stopped using Glycin because it lasts so long. They would rather you use their product once and discard (then of course you'd have to buy more) than keep using it for months on end!!!

    Murray

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