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  1. #11

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    I use D-23 instead of D-76 when I want more compensation effect and acutance. I don't think it's a developer for all occassions. Negatives from it have a quite distinct look. It is, however, a very useful, good developer that works with just about any film. One point, though. Be careful mixing it. It is very sensitive to stray alkalai, and tap water with a slightly high pH could turn your negatives to soot.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth
    I use D-23 instead of D-76 when I want more compensation effect and acutance. I don't think it's a developer for all occassions. Negatives from it have a quite distinct look. It is, however, a very useful, good developer that works with just about any film. One point, though. Be careful mixing it. It is very sensitive to stray alkalai, and tap water with a slightly high pH could turn your negatives to soot.
    Using filtered water that has been boiled and allowed to cool to the required mixing temperature should help. A sequesterer such as Sodium Hexametaphosphate (Calgon) can help to get rid of any nasties in the water too, try about one gram per litre to start with.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott.
    Using filtered water that has been boiled and allowed to cool to the required mixing temperature should help. A sequesterer such as Sodium Hexametaphosphate (Calgon) can help to get rid of any nasties in the water too, try about one gram per litre to start with.
    Calgon is a copyrighted trademark that apparently began life as a contraction of "Calcium Gone."

    The current version of Calgon does not contain Sodium Hexametaphosphate.

    The product currently called "New Calgon Water Softener" in the USA is phosphate free. The same product is called "Original Calgon" in the UK.

    The main ingredients of both of these Calgon products are:

    Sodium carbonate
    Trisodium citrate dihydrate
    Sodium sulfate

    See:
    http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.go...nds&id=18001030

    For a chelating agent/sequestrant, you are probably better off with either Tetra sodium EDTA or Sodium Hexametaphospate.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  4. #14
    BarrieB's Avatar
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    Can someone put up the "Formulae " for D 23 and D 23 divided, please .

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarrieB
    Can someone put up the "Formulae " for D 23 and D 23 divided, please .

    see Tom Hoskinson's first reply to this thread on the first page.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    Calgon is a copyrighted trademark that apparently began life as a contraction of "Calcium Gone."

    The current version of Calgon does not contain Sodium Hexametaphosphate.

    The product currently called "New Calgon Water Softener" in the USA is phosphate free. The same product is called "Original Calgon" in the UK.

    The main ingredients of both of these Calgon products are:

    Sodium carbonate
    Trisodium citrate dihydrate
    Sodium sulfate

    See:
    http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.go...nds&id=18001030

    For a chelating agent/sequestrant, you are probably better off with either Tetra sodium EDTA or Sodium Hexametaphospate.
    The word CALGON is often used as a generic phrase, if we use a vacuum cleaner, we often say we are doing the hoovering even if the product is made by Dyson etc. Sodium Hexametaphosphate is commonly used as a sequestering agent. I remember reading somewhere on Ilford`s website that Ilford products are free of EDTA compounds. Sodium Tripolyphosphate seems to be the one that Ilford prefer.
    Thanks Tom.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by BarrieB
    Can someone put up the "Formulae " for D 23 and D 23 divided, please .
    An easy one to make as it is the simplest of published developer formulae.
    750 ml of water at about 50C.
    Metol developing agent: 7.5 grams
    Sodium Sulphite (anhydrous) 100.0 grams.
    more water, to make one litre.
    D-23 or similar, is probably the foundation formula of developers such as Kodak Microdol-X and Ilford Perceptol which include other components and are formulated to give extra-fine grain albeit with a subsequent loss of emulsion speed yield, usually around half to one stop.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    D-23 is a virtual equivalent of D-76, with characteristics
    which made it superior for labs using replenishhment in
    the early '40s.
    Since EVERY film is made to work well with D-76, every
    film will work well with D-23. How cool is that ?
    At least Cool. I've thought for some time that D-76 is no
    more than a low cost D23. Low cost hydroquinone with it's
    regenerative abilities takes the place of some metol.
    Do you think there is any thing to that?

    Many MQ and M only developers from the 20s and 30s use
    100 grams of sulfite with varying amounts of M and Q. That
    likely has to do with the way those developers were used
    and the films put through 70 and 80 years ago.

    IMO, metol only with sulfite developers have received short
    shift. D23 is very rich in Metol so makes a good A bath
    B bath. I suggest sulfite for the B bath. It has a ph
    between that of borax and metaborate.

    I've tested a low sulfite one-shot using 1 gram of metol
    in a 1% solution of sulfite; encouraging results with Tech
    Pan and Pan F+. A half liter, 1:3, of an 8 - 80 gram formula
    I used two nights ago did well on a roll of Delta 3200.

    Of course a two chemical developer, one or two bath,
    appeals to anybody's minimalist instincts. The only thing
    that bothers me about the Metol only sulfite combination
    is the film speed coming out of it. How close is that speed
    compared to MQ and PQ or, for that matter, MC-PC
    combinations?

    Today's films are not what they were 70 and 80 years
    ago. I don't want to be too much of a minimalist. Dan

  9. #19

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    Please note that divided D-23 is not so much a version of D-23 as derivation. It is a divided developer that can be used with the zone system for variable contrast development. It does this by partial development in D-23 and then immersion in a stronger alkalai for the remainder of the development. The contrast can be varied by changing the time in the alkalai. This high pH environment is much different than the D-23 philosophy, and the images are different.

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