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  1. #1

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    Is D23 Good To Great for Any Film?

    I only read good reports for D23. I think though it must be
    better for some emulsions than some others. How for
    instance does it do with the T and D films? Dan

  2. #2

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    Never used it but have see postings from those who rave about it for TMAX100 for control of highlights and tonality. Delta films have very crisp structures fine grain and so from my limited experience do nicely in fine grain devs. Delta 100 is great in Aculux and suspect it would be great in d23.

  3. #3
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    I use the split d-23. It is a wonderful developer. It compensates for challenging exposure situations without yielding flat negatives. It gives smooth grain but still crisp. It does not have quite the accutance of a pyro mix and it does give full emulsion speed. It works fine with TMY. I haven't used it with Delta film. I see no reason for it not to work fine.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  4. #4
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    I've used divided D-23 with TMX (TMax 100) and like it a lot. It, unlike Pyrocat HD, gets rid of the red (magenta) dye during development and makes development by inspection possible. I also like it for contrast control with that film (as well as controlling contrast with night shots on Efke PL100).
    juan

  5. #5

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    The Kodak recipe for D-23 plus a recipe for a Split version of D-23 are posted in the APUG Chemical Recipes.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/article.php?a=25

    BTW, D-23 contains a lot of sodium sulfite, which probably explains why it is good at removing the red antihalation dye from Tmax.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  6. #6
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    The Kodak recipe for D-23 plus a recipe for a Split version of D-23 are posted in the APUG Chemical Recipes.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/article.php?a=25

    BTW, D-23 contains a lot of sodium sulfite, which probably explains why it is good at removing the red antihalation dye from Tmax.

    Maybe this isn't the proper place to ask, but can one use Kodak Hypo Clearing agent for the Sodium Sulfite in preparing D23?

  7. #7
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    D-23 is a virtual equivalent of D-76, with characteristics which made it superior for labs using replenishhment in the early '40s.

    Since EVERY film is made to work well with D-76, every film will work well with D-23.

    . How cool is that ?
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    Maybe this isn't the proper place to ask, but can one use Kodak Hypo Clearing agent for the Sodium Sulfite in preparing D23?
    Sodium sulfite is not the only ingredient in Kodak HCA, it also contains some sodium bisulfite (so you'd probably end up with something closer to Kodak D-25).

    Better and less expensive to buy some sodium sulfite from The Chemistry Store, Artcraft or PF.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    I only read good reports for D23. I think though it must be
    better for some emulsions than some others. How for
    instance does it do with the T and D films? Dan
    Unfortunately, most of the information on D-23 seems to be about the two-bath version which is not much use if you loath the tonality of two-bath developed negatives.
    Ilford give developing times for HP5 Plus in ID11 diluted 1+1 for 13 minutes at 20C/68F and for Perceptol also diluted 1+1 for 15 minutes at 20C/68F.
    You could experiment by making D-23 and developing HP5 Plus for 14 minutes using a 1+1 dilution as a starting point to see if you like the performance of the developer and adjust the developing time from there as necessary for your enlarger and standard/normal paper grade.

  10. #10

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    Keith, 14 minutes seems like a good HP5 Plus starting time for a 1+1 dilution of D-23.

    I have used D-23 undiluted, diluted 1+1 and diluted 1+3.

    For D-23 undiluted, 8 minutes should be a good starting point for HP5 Plus. Temperature, 68F/20C.
    Tom Hoskinson
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