Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,946   Posts: 1,585,873   Online: 1067
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Amsterdam
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    337

    Saving my negatives from water (chalk?) marks.

    Yesterday I developed some rolls of film and while drying all three of the rolls developed water tracks on them. Some go from the top to the bottom creating tracks that pass each picture.

    It's strange since I developed loads of film and never had this problem before, my question is:

    How can I best save them?

    Can I just soak them again and run some sort of sponge over them?

    BTW I did use agepon in the final wash and tap the tanks after each agitation.

    Many thanks,
    Quinten!

  2. #2
    PeterDendrinos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    303
    I would rewash, and then lightly remove excess water with a clean damp sponge. Also some photo flo in the water helps

    Pete
    "…Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action."

    Frank Tibolt

    WWW.DENDRINOS FINE ART.COM

  3. #3
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    Switch to distilled water for the final bath, and maybe for the final wash water as well (using Ilford's sequential wash method). I'd mix the Agepon with distilled water and go with that.

    I have a terrible calcium problem with the local city water, so I get cheap spring water from a local artesian well for all my processing steps.

    Lee

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,075
    Lee L gives sound advice. After washing in regular water, make a final rinse with purified water and a wetting agent (PhotoFlo, etc.). I use Ektachrome stabilizer as a final rinse. It performs a little hardening as well as wetting. Purified water doesn't have to be distilled provided it is free from particulates and compunds that will precipitate onto the film. These are mostly calcium and magnesium compounds. Deionized water works well, and some of the home water purifiers will give good results.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1
    All of the above.
    I frequently re-wash with a little photo-flo when I get that.
    Just the other day, I read a tip - Dry your negs diagonally, to minimize the number of frames on which a streak will appear.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    726
    I put the final wash water through a normal domestic chemical water filter (several times) to get the lime out. It's cheaper than using distilled and works as well.

    David.

  7. #7
    Maine-iac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Island Heights, NJ, but will retire back to Maine.
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    464
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinten
    Yesterday I developed some rolls of film and while drying all three of the rolls developed water tracks on them. Some go from the top to the bottom creating tracks that pass each picture.

    It's strange since I developed loads of film and never had this problem before, my question is:

    How can I best save them?

    Can I just soak them again and run some sort of sponge over them?

    BTW I did use agepon in the final wash and tap the tanks after each agitation.

    Many thanks,
    Quinten!

    If your water is really hard (lots of calcium), you can neutralize it simply by adding a 1/4 tsp. or so of water softening crystals. You only need to do this for the final wash. Also, add a drop or two of Photo-Flo, and when you hang your negs up, use your index and middle fingers as a "soft squeegee" and lightly strip excess water from your negs. I usually dip my fingers in the final wash water to wet them before doing this. My fingers have never scratched my negs, but squeegee sponges, even very soft ones have if a tiny piece of grit has managed to stick to them.

    Larry

  8. #8
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    Just as information for those suggesting Photo-Flo:

    Agepon is a wetting agent like Photo-Flo, and Quinten's already using it.

    Lee

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,670
    If the marks are from hard water, soak the film in your regular stop bath for a few minutes to dissolve the deposits and then rewash. Use a wetting agent such as PhotoFlo in the last rinse. Be sure not to use too much, only a few drops of wetting agent are needed. Too much will also cause spots.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Amsterdam
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    337
    Thanks for the tips! My first reaction was to use more wetting agent but it seems more isn't always better.

    Gerald:
    soak the film in your regular stop bath for a few minutes to dissolve the deposits and then rewash.
    As a stop bath I use water, would a real stop be better to get rith of the chalk marks in this particulair case?

    Another tip I rechieved is to use the calcium free water you can buy for team irons, it's cheap and does the trick for the final wash.

    cheers!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin