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  1. #21

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    FWIW, I sometimes use Dektol 1+4 to get slightly, and I do me slightly, warmer tones on otherwise neutral toned papers. Once you've runa few prints through it, the effect becomes more noticeable. This makes sense in a way. Warm tone developers usually contain more bromide than cold tone developers, and use less alkali. Using a more dilute than usual working solution of Dektol results in less alkali per unit of measure. Developing a few prints in a working batch raises the bromide levels.

  2. #22
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti
    I guess you meant Ilford MG FB Warmtone, right?
    Indeed I did...sorry I forgot to add "Warmtone" to my post. I understand your dislike for the cream-colored base of the paper...I just find that it works well for me. (It's far from the only paper I use...it's just my warmtone paper of choice. To each his own.)

    I'm with you in that I've always been told to dilute the developer more to get more warmtone effect, and less for neutral effect. This has been my "common wisdom" with Neutol-WA and with Ethol LPD for years.

    I think you got a batch of mislabeled paper. Any warmtone paper in Neutol-WA should give you warm tones without fuss. Your process is fine, so there's nothing there that's causing the problem. If you have warmtone paper then I'm shocked. I'd say to try another batch of paper to see what happens...save the package you have now for when you want neutral or cold tones.

    Best of luck to you.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  3. #23

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    It seems I had gotten the facts messed up. Increased dilution should give warmer tones. Your times and dilution should by all means give warm tones, so something is wrong with the paper. Have you compared the dry prints to dry prints of another manufacturer? If there is any warm tone in the paper it _will_ be evident if compared to something like Ilford MGIV RC or Kentmere VC Select.

    Good luck!

    *h

  4. #24
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    Yes, experience is that greater dilution = greater warmth.

    I am surprised by this too as I have used Polywarmtone RC in Neutol WA (1+9 - which is my usual warmtone developer) and the tone is unmistakable and VERY warm... I have had WA in my Nova for several weeks with no detectable change in effect so it is unlikely to be an age issue.

    You didn't end up with a bottle of Neutol NE instead of WA by any chance?

    Very odd.


    Cheers, Bob.

  5. #25

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    Hi. I'm a new member, and have been using Forte Polywarmtone as my standard paper for the past few years. Though I've not tried the Neutol WA, I've tried a number of developers with this paper, and have found that the ZonalPro HQ Warmtone developer, diluted 1:19 for 4 to 4-1/2 minutes gives me the best results: nice golden brown skin tones, and deep chocolate brown-black shadows. I have to be careful with selenium toning though, for I find the paper becomes cooler, not warmer, with toning. I'd be curious to know if others see that effect. Anyway, the standard dilution for ZonalPro HQ Warmtone is 1:10, so the adage of the higher the dilution, the warmer the tones is true, though one must compensate for a commensurate loss of contrast. It also helps, I find, to keep the developer warm, at about 75 degrees. Sounds silly, perhaps, but it makes a difference.

    Best,
    Roger.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by litwit
    I have to be careful with selenium toning though, for I find the paper becomes cooler, not warmer, with toning. I'd be curious to know if others see that effect.
    I get the oppsite effect. In an eariler post, you can see the extreme results I get with selenium 1+9 for about 4 minutes. The print is actually brown, not brown-black. With two minutes the blacks stay black, and the low mids get a red-brown color. The paper splits, so it might not be everyones cup of tea.

  7. #27
    NikoSperi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timeUnit
    I get the oppsite effect. In an eariler post, you can see the extreme results I get with selenium 1+9 for about 4 minutes. The print is actually brown, not brown-black. With two minutes the blacks stay black, and the low mids get a red-brown color. The paper splits, so it might not be everyones cup of tea.
    Yes, exactly my experience with KRST and Polywarmtone. Not my cup of tea, really. I'd be happier with a sort of halfway house between Neutol NE and WA...

    Anyone know if mixing them work? 50:50 NE and WA all at 1:9?
    If you tone it down alot, it almost becomes bearable.

    - Walker Evans on using color

  8. #28
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    Since the Forte warmtone is coated on a white base your prints will look less warm if there are a lot of light tones in them than if dark tones are dominant.

    I got good results using homebrew D-52 which is similar to the old Kodak Selectolm, warmer than D-72 (dektol). Never tried Neutol.

    Mike D

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