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  1. #21

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    Paul,

    the Classic Pan 400 (= Fortepan 400) are indeed "classic" film from Hungary, quite different from modern emulsions. Seems like a lot of Germans over here have experience with it, here's a summary:

    - Famous for it's grain. Seems like fans of that kind of grain do like the film.
    - Classic look, good midtones.
    - Sharpness okay
    - Exposing the 400 at ~ 200 ASA not a bad idea.
    - Classic Pan is more like a tungsten, not a daylight film, with it's expanded red sensibility.
    - D76 / ID11 seem to deal quite well with it.

    General problem: The manufacturer does not have quality control comparable to, say, Ilford. The film can behave quite differently depending when and where you got it. People here call it a film for enthusiasts, but most users are disappointed by it and discontinued using it. Personally I only used it for a few rolls, long time ago, in 35mm. The results were horrible, but that of course was also due to the small neg size.

  2. #22
    dphphoto's Avatar
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    Hi: I've been tray developing JandC 400 in HC110 dil. H, with very good results, and have not been experiencing excessive grain. In fact, I like the look of the film. I enlarge to 11X14 on Kentmere and get some pretty smooth skies, nothing like what I saw on your scan.
    Like others, I've always thought Kodak has done everyone a diservice by promoting B as the standard dilution. I've always gotten better results by using a greater dilution, usually E or H.
    I'm exposing at e.i. 200, and developing for 8 min. at 70 degrees, with one flip through the stack every 30 seconds for agitation. Then, water for stop and 4 min in Photographers' Formulary TF-4 rapid fix. (Talk about mixing your brands. You should see what I do with designer clothes.)
    Not sure if any of this is relevant since you use a Jobo. I love those things (I used one at a place I used to work for) but they're soooo much more expensive than a set of trays. Dean
    dphphoto

  3. #23
    Rolleijoe's Avatar
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    7 minutes

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Sorensen
    Good question. I used B and since it was a new film/dev combo for me, I used Massive Dev Chart times minus 20% for contstant agitation. (About 7 minutes)

    Ah, 7 min is way too long. I usually do mine between 5.5-6.5 min depending on the contrast of what was shot. By looking at your scans, while it's not quite a grain-fest, it does seem to show more grain than would be expected from LF film.

    Rolleijoe

  4. #24
    Amund's Avatar
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    Here`s a picture
    Classic 400, HC-100 Dil H in a CEP-2.
    Developed in dil B I get more grain too, in dil H it seems smoother.
    Amund
    __________________________________________
    -Digital is nice but film is like having sex with light-

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