Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,849   Posts: 1,582,824   Online: 737
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,554
    Images
    15

    Now we ask the question

    Who makes the paper and film we use and how stable are the companies and how long will they produce the materials.

    Micheal Smith says Kodak will provide him with the remainder of Azo paper, then sells it to some unknown enitiy.
    JandC can't provide all of the products it lists all of the time.
    Amidol developer wasn't available for months this Summer/Fall.

    There are no film camera stores with complete inventories. My one and only store in town has a one shelf "real" photo shelf, mostly enpty.

    I just went to France and couldn't find a real photograph there. Everything is digital. And NO TRIPODS IN PARIS. They are pushing film photography into the trash there as they are here in the US.

    Maybe the world community should ban paint and canvas or clay? Better yet burn all of the Art and Photography books. Have everything digital so it can be examined to determine if it is legal and acceptable.

    I can see the problems that the early artists had with the Church and Governments. Artists are like a fragile flower that only grows under specific conditions and is easily crushed and made extinct.

  2. #2
    blaze-on's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,432
    Images
    61
    It's hard not to think about it when so many are abandoning craft for so called "ease".

    I just returned from a small local show. ALL inkjet, labeled on back as such, but what really got my goat was the one guy who labeled his b&w inkjets as..(sit down, hold on to the chair arms..) well, he labeled them as "piezoelectric". WTF is that supposed to mean?

    Besides the prints being absolutely devoid of any emotional content and just plain "dead", I can only assume that they were printed and then zapped with a defibrillator or some shock device.

    To be honest, there were two B&w's that I feel got the most out of the epson technology. Many were digital "capture" as well.

    Plain dead. Piezoelectrifried.
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,534
    Images
    65
    Shocking.

    PE

  4. #4
    david b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    None of your business
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,034
    Images
    30
    My favorite inkjet terms are:
    - giclee
    - archival ultrachrome
    - digital c print

    I know there are several more but I'm a bit brain dead at the moment.

    Why not just call them for what they are: inkjet prints

    And again I scream out loud: support ilford

  5. #5
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,895
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by blaze-on
    he labeled them as "piezoelectric". WTF is that supposed to mean?
    It means that he not only uses an inkjet, but he is proud of how it manages to shoot the ink onto the paper. According to Epson, this was quite an innovation in 1993 when they introduced it. It is the inkjet equivalent of advertising your "cold light" prints. Come to think of it, that might sound cool, "Silver Gelatin Cold Light Prints." :o

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by david b
    My favorite inkjet terms are:
    - giclee
    - archival ultrachrome
    - digital c print

    I know there are several more but I'm a bit brain dead at the moment.

    Why not just call them for what they are: inkjet prints

    And again I scream out loud: support ilford
    A "digital c print" is not an inkjet print. It is made by direct exposure on type c photo paper thru one of a number of means. Digital yes, but not an inkjet. The existence and commercial viability of these hybrid prints is one of the factors which keeps cut sheet color paper available for those who want to make (analog) C prints in low volumes. The downside of this symbiosis is that the success of lightjets, chromiras, frontiers, dlabs, etc. has served to effectively push direct reversal processes into the empty elevator shaft of history.

    I think the folks you want to call on the carpet are the ones referring to monochrome inkjets as "carbon prints." At best this demonstrates a lack of awareness of photo history. If I boldly announced that my next oeuvre would consist exclusively of the specular brilliance of 57 chevy bumpers captured in pinhole photographs you might suspect I was a bit daft but harmless. However, if I announced that I was calling the prints "Autochromes", I think I would be roundly (and rightfully) called to task. Carbon Giclee?
    Celac.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    291
    Images
    10

    use film

    There must be millions of film cameras out there, if people continue to use them film will stay with us. Many young people are satisfied with looking at an instant result on their mobile phone screen. Recently I observed a group of teenagers enthuse about all the fantastic shots they had taken on their phones. They then proceeded to wipe their memory cards clean ready for the next lot of instant pictures. Good fun for them, yes, but is it photography or is it image capture? Will future generations care how a picture is produced? I think not, just as long as it is instant and its quality is acceptable to them digital will tick all the boxes. It seems like Kodak have recognised that the majority of people love photographs but are too lazy or hate having to learn how to make them, digital is the answer, pop the memory card into a digital workstation, press a few buttons and thats it. What you get are prints that are acceptable to the majority, if they need tweaking there is always photo shop, which for some is too much to learn. You can argue forever the advantages/ disadvantages of film versus digital, but just take a moment and think how lazy the majority of the human race is, excellence in anything takes effort. For me producing an excellent b&w print takes a lot of effort, I also: climb mountains, ride motorcycles as fast as they will go, restore vintage bikes, cars, cameras , guns, furniture etc,etc. For me doing the hard things in life gives me great satisfaction, a natural high. Have I got it wrong? Maybe if I was young today I would take the easy way, pop a few pills, sniff a bit of coke, drink myself to a standstill and take pictures on my mobie phone, have a laugh at the photos of myself and others totally incapacitated, then wipe the phones memory and my own because to be honest the high wasnt so good after all. Who can take good photographs when intoxicated anyway? Could that be a new topic?Apologies for the rant I have become middle aged.

  8. #8
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by david b
    My favorite inkjet terms are:
    - giclee
    - archival ultrachrome
    - digital c print

    I know there are several more but I'm a bit brain dead at the moment.

    Why not just call them for what they are: inkjet prints

    See here what happens when you actually say this in the presence of *grits teeth* 'digital darkroom' users . It is an interesting thread, things get 'warm' on page four)


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    SE London.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    585
    Images
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt
    There are no film camera stores with complete inventories. My one and only store in town has a one shelf "real" photo shelf, mostly enpty..
    Not true. My nearest photography shop is stuffed with film, paper, chemicals etc. Silverprint (for it is they) in London continue to add to their inventory with new films, e.g. rollei R3. They are also doing a roaring trade in digital stuff. See, analogue and digital can exist side by side.

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt
    I just went to France and couldn't find a real photograph there. Everything is digital. And NO TRIPODS IN PARIS. They are pushing film photography into the trash there as they are here in the US.
    The no tripod rule, along with the no street photography rule is *not* anti film, it's anti photography. That doesn't stop you whipping out a press 5x4, using a SLR, TLR, rangefinder etc.

  10. #10
    gnashings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,376
    Images
    17
    Andy,

    My favorite stupidity of the current time: "Is this film or digital?" below a screen capture of an image. Its pixels on a monitor, and turned into zeroes and ones somehow to get there - ITS ALL DIGITAL on a computer screen.
    Nice way to share your images with people - I am eternally grateful for our APUG galleries because I get to see some wonderful photos I would otherwise have no access to (and get valuable input on my own stuff) - but for the sake of these idiotic "bet you can't tell" tests... there is hardly anything more pointless.
    Frankly, I couldn't stomach going to page four, I gave up...

    Peter.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin