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  1. #11

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    Regardless of what film/developer combination you use John's advice to overexpose and underdevelop slightly is very sound, IMO.

    I agree with what others have said about matching film and developers to specific circumstances and needs. However, this presumes a rather more sophisticated degree of control and more knowledge than is often the case with persons struggling with issues such as overexposure and/or overdevelopment.

    I am not sure what system of exposure the originator of this thread is using, but my advice to almost anyone would be to invest in a good hand-held meter and learn to use it well in both reflective and incident modes. I personally recommend the incident system as the most fool proof for beginners, and flexible enough for very advanced users as well, but that is another story.

    Sandy

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bragg
    The best rule of thumb to produce glowing negatives that minimise the underlying grain structure is to overexpose slightly and under develop.Try rating TX at 200ASA and cut your dev time by 20% as a starting point. You should then find the kind of negs you seem to prefer are easier to achieve. Have a look at the late James Ravilious pictures, made using this technique and ancient Leicas with uncoated lenses. Tri-x was his favorite film and handled this way,the results are stunning !!!

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider
    Why not try a roll of Delta, Tmax or something else? For that matter try another developer too. I like Xtol.
    If the original poster is finding Tri-X tricky in low light situations, TMax400 will be trickier as far as shadow detail is concerned.

  3. #13
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    I would not use pyrocat on 35mm - use XTOL - just as sharp - full film speed and much finer grain - also pushes better. i use Pyrocat for 4x5 and 8x10 film - no grain problems there
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by fhovie
    I would not use pyrocat on 35mm - use XTOL - just as sharp - full film speed and much finer grain - also pushes better. i use Pyrocat for 4x5 and 8x10 film - no grain problems there
    I would disagree. I can't speak about target tests and "sharpness," but in regards to acutance Pyrocat HD is much much more acute than anything I've done with full strength XTOL. Can't argue about the grain though.

    BTW, everyone seems to have construed from my posting that I am in search of fine grain. I don't think that is remotely what I wrote. I love grain. If you have a formula for staining Rodinal please give it to me. I love Pyrocat HD. It pretty much has allowed me to have my cake and eat it too. I can expose liberally and still retain highlight definition. It is superbly "acute," has great tonality, and delivers full emulsion speed. You want to touch the images.

    That said, I don't think it gives a very pleasing grain structure as compared to other developers, and that is important to ME.

  5. #15

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    Rodinal is not a staining developer. I am not sure what you hope to gain by using a staining developer with an enlarger, the stain is certainly going to make the grain look a little muddy.
    You can protect the highlights with rodinal using semi-stand development. I am doing 1:100 for 30 minutes and following Mr Cardwell's agitation like he mentions here
    http://www.apug.org/forums/showthrea...hlight=rodinal
    This combination will certainly give you that classic grain structure.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMfoto
    I would disagree. I can't speak about target tests and "sharpness," but in regards to acutance Pyrocat HD is much much more acute than anything I've done with full strength XTOL. Can't argue about the grain though.

    BTW, everyone seems to have construed from my posting that I am in search of fine grain. I don't think that is remotely what I wrote. I love grain. If you have a formula for staining Rodinal please give it to me. I love Pyrocat HD. It pretty much has allowed me to have my cake and eat it too. I can expose liberally and still retain highlight definition. It is superbly "acute," has great tonality, and delivers full emulsion speed. You want to touch the images.

    That said, I don't think it gives a very pleasing grain structure as compared to other developers, and that is important to ME.
    Now you've triggered my interest. It is not difficult to add the stain of Pyrocat HD or PMK or any other staining developer to a negative that has been developed in Rodinal or D-76 or any other non-staining developer. Make sure your negative has been thoroughly fixed and washed. Bleach it in the same bleach you would use for sepia toning. Redevelop to completion in the staining developer of your choice.

    The bleach can be as simple as 1 tsp potassium ferricyanide + 1 tsp potassium bromide in 500 ml water. Bleach to completion. Wash in plain water. Redevelop. The original silver image will return with the same grain structure and the stain of pyrogallol or catechol will be added.

    This technique is useful on thin negatives. It may be worth your while to try NOT pushing the original development in Rodinal or whatever and then applying the bleach-redevelopment in Pyrocat. While many seem to think that stained negatives print at lower contrast on VC paper, they also seem to forget that the higher contrast filters have more effect. The contrast on graded paper will always be increased by the red-yellow part of the stain.
    Gadget Gainer

  7. #17

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    I have heard of bleaching B&W negatives and then redeveloping in pyro sometime ago and then kind of forgot about it. What do you define as "bleaching to completion"?
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  8. #18

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    Bleaching and redeveloping will do nothing to help a blocked up negative. So you loose even that benefit of using a staining developer. Why would you do this?

  9. #19

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    Why do you say this? You can develop the negative back to a lower or higher contrast. I have done this quite often with negatives that were originally too contrasty because of overdevelopment. Bleaching and redevelopment made them much easier to print, especially in the highlights.

    Sandy


    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    Bleaching and redeveloping will do nothing to help a blocked up negative. So you loose even that benefit of using a staining developer. Why would you do this?

  10. #20
    kunihiko's Avatar
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    I've tried bleaching and redevelopment method which suggested above.
    My old negatives were under developed, because I used to use a condenser head. After I switched to diffusion one, I've been feeling they are bit hard to be printed as I wish.
    I read another post about bleach-redevelop thing in APUG, I bleached and redeveloped most of my thin negatives with Pyrocat-HD and found that It works very well, sometime they are even better than normally developed negatives (maybe just for me).
    It is great that I can have second chance to control the development.

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