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  1. #11
    lee
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    absolutely. dont need it much but when you do you do.

    lee\c

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gay Larson
    ...I use a cup covered in black duck tape except for the bottom and cover the lens to flash...
    How brilliantly low-tech! I LOVE IT!!

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MurrayMinchin
    How brilliantly low-tech! I LOVE IT!!

    Murray
    Some people even use a second enlarger. I happen to have a chromega B that's been replaced by the chromega D , but the B has seen some duty as the flasher. My long term plan is to rig up a very low voltage bulb, and use a timer (as in a prior post). Then the B can be retired and I can gain some counter space!

    I will admit to having the RH flasher as the ultimate, but one can make do.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://silverdarkroom.net
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  4. #14
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    I routinely use split grade printing and don't have alot of need for flashing. Recently I took some 4x5 TMAX 100 negatives in Florida that were important to me. I was inattentive when developing them and somehow developed them for almost twice the desired time so they were overdeveloped and contrasty. Pre-flashing the paper and split grade printing made up for the problems and I liked the results.
    Jerold Harter MD

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauldc
    If the two techniques are used as alternatives, do people try to print the negative first with split-grade printing (trying to get highlight detail with the 0 grade filter) and then resort to flashing if this is not working? Or is it a more instinctive thing and experienced printers spot which negatives will respond best to each technique?

    Being fairly inexperienced myself, I need to learn now when and where to deploy these new techniques.
    Yes to quetion #1. I use flashing only as a last resort, since it affects other areas and contrasts of the print. To question #2, both. When I know a technique or style I am going for, I will know from looking at the neg. Sometimes I don't see it until I try a test print first. There's also been times where I don't want to fool with it much, and I'll just flash the particular area that needs help, so as not to bring over variables into the rest of the print. Hot water can also help bring in problem highlights after burning and I usually use that before flashing.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #16
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    At Les' workshop in APUG Toronto he demonstrated both split grade printing and flashing. He said to use them together. Do the split grade printing first, then the flashing and the results would be best.

    He brought six RH Designs flashers to sell @ $100 US . It took at least four seconds to sell out. He will pick up six more in Philadelphia next week. He is going to send me one so that none of the Canadians have to pay duty. I had lots of fun being the “gofor” with Les and Tim Rudman. Both wonderful people and artists.

    Lee, you must get the good stuff because you hold the workshops. Les would only sell me the standard RH Designs flasher, not the “fancy scmancy flashers”. Wish I could attend your workshop. As in most things, Les is more.

    John Powers

  7. #17
    lee
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    Flashing is a misunderstood technique I think. With the RH Designs Paper Flasher II you can flash an area of the print or the whole print. A lot of people burn in those "hot" areas with a grade 0 and then flash. Generally speaking this turns the problem area to mud. I have a neg that needs to be burned in on a fellows jacket. In real life this jacket is Chrome Yellow. It really glows on the neg. The answer is to use the "hard" filter to burn in the area of the jacket that was giving me the trouble. This will enhance the shadows that are on the jacket naturally and then flash the area (no neg in the light path) to add density. This sorta goes against what we have always learned but it works much better and does not turn the area in question to mud. One of the advantages of using the Flasher II is that it is it's own light source so the negative is not disturbed in the carrier. Gay mentioned using a styrofoam cup over the lens but to do what I just described the negative will have to be removed from the light path. Not a big deal. But it is time that you save. Convenience is what you are paying for.

    lee\c

  8. #18
    lee
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    John said, "Lee, you must get the good stuff because you hold the workshops."

    Lee said, "I don't have any fancy scmancy flasher I just got the one that Les is selling everyone."

    lee\c

  9. #19
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee
    One of the advantages of using the Flasher II is that it is it's own light source so the negative is not disturbed in the carrier. Gay mentioned using a styrofoam cup over the lens but to do what I just described the negative will have to be removed from the light path. Not a big deal. But it is time that you save. Convenience is what you are paying for.

    lee\c
    True. This is another reason why I will "improve" my set-up with the separate lightbulb, rather than moving the easel over to another enlarger.

    Who knows, I'll probably spring for the fancy - smancy if I get good at it.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://silverdarkroom.net
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  10. #20
    hortense's Avatar
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    Selective Flashing

    Quote Originally Posted by lee
    ... With the RH Designs Paper Flasher II you can flash an area of the print or the whole print. A lot of people burn in those "hot" areas with a grade 0 and then flash. Generally speaking this turns the problem area to mud. I have a neg that needs to be burned in on a fellows jacket. In real life this jacket is Chrome Yellow. ...
    lee\c
    To avoid the "muddy look", Ruby/Amber masking film is a useful way to do highly selective flashing. Just cut out areas of the mask where you wish to perform tight flashing. I've use this technique successfully several times to avoid "spill-over" from flashing even when using my so called selective flashing device.
    [FONT=Times New Roman]MAC[/FONT]

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