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  1. #21
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    I'm bouncing around the site reading up on flashing paper (pre and post) with and without split-grade printing.

    I'm not understanding the idea of post-flashing, I'm afraid. If the purpose of flashing is not to produce tone, but to overcome inertia, how does that make sense with post-flashing?

  2. #22
    lee
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    Quote Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
    I'm not understanding the idea of post-flashing, I'm afraid. If the purpose of flashing is not to produce tone, but to overcome inertia, how does that make sense with post-flashing?
    Post flashing does put a tone down. That is the reason for it. To do so, make your print and in the areas where there is NO tone and you would like tone do it this way. Burn in the area first with a hard filter like a #5 then flash for the time it takes to produce a tone you want. By using the #5 filter you avoid making the area muddy like you would if you used the more conventional thoughts on burning in.

    lee\c

  3. #23
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    Ah, I call that fogging. Is this something different than the selective fogging to add tone to a blocked up highlight area that I am familiar with?

  4. #24
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    If post-flash = fogging (remedial addition of tone to a blown-out highlight), and preflash is a non-remedial method of overcoming the emulsion's inherent inertia to achieve better local contrast, then I understand what's going on. If that's the case, then I'm more interested in pre than post, though I am not dismissive of the need for bandaids in certain situations.

  5. #25
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    I love this website because before comeing here...if Fred Picker didn't teach me something (ok, and St. Ansel too), I didn't know it existed. I'm learning things about staining developers, sprlit-grade, f-stop printing, pre-flashing papers, etc., etc. that are quite a revelation to me.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
    I love this website because before comeing here...if Fred Picker didn't teach me something (ok, and St. Ansel too), I didn't know it existed. I'm learning things about staining developers, sprlit-grade, f-stop printing, pre-flashing papers, etc., etc. that are quite a revelation to me.
    Similar experience for me. However, I am more grateful to this site for the people I've met. Reading about flashing is one thing. Seeing a Les McLean or a Lee Carmichael DO IT and the difference it can make, is the revelation!:o

    And I wouldn't dismiss post-flashing as a "band-aid" until you've seen it in action. (Or, done it yourself.)
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
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  7. #27
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    I think Lees point about using a 5 filter alongside the post flash is a critical point.
    I use post flashing at times to define a white sky and the paper white borders. When I can see a hint of edge tone I have flashed enough. To me there is nothing worse in a print than to have the borders and the edge of the image blending together to white. Unless it is a deliberate close crop fade to white.

  8. #28

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    Pre or post flashing?

    Quote Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
    If post-flash = fogging (remedial addition of tone to a blown-out highlight), and preflash is a non-remedial method of overcoming the emulsion's inherent inertia to achieve better local contrast, then I understand what's going on. If that's the case, then I'm more interested in pre than post, though I am not dismissive of the need for bandaids in certain situations.
    Can anyone tell me whether there's really a difference between flashing before the main exposure (pre-flashing) and flashing afterwards (post-flashing), as long as one uses the same filtration and exposure time? i.e. is there really some special chemical process involved in "overcoming the emulsion's inertia" when the paper hasn't had any previous exposure at all? Or is exposure just exposure, regardless of what order you give it in?

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by erich potgieter View Post
    Can anyone tell me whether there's really a difference between flashing before the main exposure (pre-flashing) and flashing afterwards (post-flashing), as long as one uses the same filtration and exposure time? i.e. is there really some special chemical process involved in "overcoming the emulsion's inertia" when the paper hasn't had any previous exposure at all? Or is exposure just exposure, regardless of what order you give it in?
    Yes, there really is a difference in results, the best way to understand it is to try it for yourself.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  10. #30

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    They are different techniques with different outcomes and objectives Paul.
    The split grading is really IMO to quickly get both the exposure time and contrast grade (filtration) matched to the negative. From there you can interpret the final print the way you want it without having to cope with unnecessary dodging and burning from having the contrast & filtration mismatched (what you might call rescue dodging/burning, as opposed to interpretative or creative dodging/burning).
    It also gives you the option of dodging during either the Gr.)).) exposure or the Gr.5 exposure, or a combination - thus altering local contrast too.

    Flashing is useful to raise the threshold of the paper to exposure so that it is much more 'sensitive' at the highlight end, where little light is getting through. This makes burning in either unnecessary or much easier when it is required. It also alters contrast and so can be used with graded papers for in-between grades.

    The two techniques can be used separately of together as required.

    Various flashing tools have been discussed here. The RH flasher has its own timer, which can be useful. It is commonly used on the enlarger though, near the lens. I find this less convenient as its distance from the paper - and hence the flashing time - changes as the enlarger is moved. I like to get a 'max-flash' time for a whole box of paper, which I can then repeat without re-testing for diferent enlargers. I also found that blu-tacking it onto the base plate tending to cause alignment shifts on my enlargers so be aware and avoid using pressure to hold it in place - elastic bands might be better. I find it simpler to use a second enlarger for flashing or a distant low wattage night light (I use both for different applications) - connected to my timer (I use the second channel on my R H Designs Stopclock Pro for this - very easy to toggle back and forth)

    Another point to be careful of: If your flasher is not exactly in the negative light path (e.g. a distant flasher, or one alongside the lens or lens board, it will shine obliquely on the paper and if the paper is in the easle you will probably see an unflashed 'flash shadow' strip along one or two sides on the image. Don't flash in the easle unless you can exclude this.
    Tim

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