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  1. #1

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    "High sulfite concentrations" and t-grain films.

    Can anyone tell me why developers with "high sulfite concentrations"(Film Developing Cookbook, and online posts) are not recommended for t-grain films, and for that matter, what is considered a high concentration?

  2. #2
    fhovie's Avatar
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    TMY in Microdol can be enlarged quite a bit - it is not edgy but it is smooth and not a bad choice for roll films and 16x20 photos
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  3. #3

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    D-76 is a high sulfite developer, and it is definitely recommended for t-grain films - and it gives excellent results. But it is recommended at the 1:1 dilution (50 g/l sulfite), which is less than something like D-23. T-grain films probably don't benefit much, or at all, from the solvent action of high sulfite concentrations. In ordinary films, the sulfite helps expose the silver halide grains to the developing agent (increasing speed), reduces the developed grain size and changes the shape of the developed grain. All these benefit ordinary film. With small, face oriented grains, they may be unneccessay.

  4. #4

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    I'm also a little confused by the fact that XTOL has a relatively high sulfite concentration(or at least according to the patent-85mg), and that developer is highly recommended for t-grain films.

    I have had a good deal of success with Acufine with TMZ, and that is definitely a high sulfite developer. I am planning to mix and try some FX-11 soon, and would like to understand why lower sulfite levels would benefit t-grain films before I go tinkering with the recipe, as recommended by Anchel & Troop.

  5. #5

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    I think high-sulfite developers work better with T-grain or Delta-grain films than they do with older films like Tri-X. The newer films lose less accutance to the solvent action, while giving very fine grain.

  6. #6
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    D76, as lovely as it is, is not the best choice with T Grain films... not because of anything WRONG, but because XTOL is so fantastic with the films.

    If you actually LIKE acufine, that ancient , crude and barbaric developer, XTOL will knock your socks off.

    Instead of thinking there are good developers and evil developers, I find it easier to think that even highly capable research scientists are able to improve things in 70 years ( D76 ) and 45+ years ( acufine ).

    AS for FX11, it was pretty hot stuff in the '60s. XTOL will get more speed, better acutance and less grain. Not to mention a better usable curve. Ascorbate simply wasn't an option 40 years ago.

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  7. #7

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    The problem with XTOL is that it is perfect on all points accept one; I don't usually like it. I have done some very nice things with XTOL and TX 120, and with Delta 3200. But for the vast majority of my work I do not like the tonality. It has a "brightness" to it, it's just so "nice."

    I do like APX400 and Rodinal in 135, TMZ in Acufine, Rodinal and FX-39. Those combos fulfill most of my needs and have a mood and other qualities that are important to me.

    I do think Acufine has a nice look and gives a nice balance of pushability, grain structure I like, and tonality with TMZ. That has made me curious to try FX-11, as it appears to be very similar to the FX-4 formula that is purported to be similar to Acufine, and I am so curious to see what a glycin version does to TMZ.
    Last edited by MMfoto; 02-05-2006 at 12:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMfoto
    ...snip..

    I do think Acufine has a nice look and gives a nice balance of pushability, grain structure I like, and tonality with TMZ. That has made me curious to try FX-11, as it appears to be very similar to the FX-4 formula that is purported to be similar to Acufine, and I am so curious to see what a glycin version does to TMZ.
    Nothing to argue with there !

    Keep us posted -
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  9. #9

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    If you think about it the solvent effect will eat away at a flat crystal much quicker than a round one.
    art is about managing compromise

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    If you think about it the solvent effect will eat away at a flat crystal much quicker than a round one.
    That depends. Sulfite is a poor silver halide solvent actually. You can use D76 as a monobath for Chloride emulsions and Chlorobromides with great speed loss, but it does not happen with bromoiodides. A high iodide t-grain or a t-grain with epitaxy could hardly be touched by the sulfite at the sensitivity centers.

    It also depends on development rate vs solvation rate and after that it depends on the redeposition rate of dissolved silver on developing silver sites.

    Final answer is, the only way to find out is to try the developer with the film and determine if it suits your purpose.

    PE

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