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  1. #11
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    Although I prefer Acros, if you are already familiar with FP4+ and you like it better, why switch?
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  2. #12
    haziz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t_nunn
    Although I prefer Acros, if you are already familiar with FP4+ and you like it better, why switch?
    1. I would rather spend my nights sleeping than changing film in a changing bag. I will try to shoot very early in the morning. There is a lot to be said for not having to worry about changing film.

    2. While I have used hundreds of sheets of the FP4+, I am not unfamiliar with both Acros and Tmax 100 and am probably approaching 100 sheets of the Acros, and probably 60-80 of the Tmax. I have also used them both fairly extensively in 120 film size. My problem to some extent is that while I am fairly settled on a routine with FP4+ (even there I am still experimenting) I have not settled on a real routine specially with Acros. I have had fairly good results with Tmax 100 in Tmax RS diluted 1:9. For some reason however I have felt the need to try Xtol 1:1 with all 3 films.

    3. A concern regarding dust and holders in the Southwest.

    4. I was envisaging using Quickloads and Readyloads for the bulk of the pictures with some shots interspersed in 5x7 if I wish to do contact prints. I do tend to shoot a lot of film and will easily do 20-40 sheets a day in New England (I do two copies of each shot). Depending on the logistics there and the traveling distances between locations I may end up shooting more or less film there, probably more. If I am doing all of my photography in FP4+ I would have to take most of my holders (40 or so 4x5 and 20 5x7). To ease my travel plans I intend to carry my camera as carry on and have 2 boxes of Quickloads (and the Quickload and Readload holders) and some 120/220 film just in case my mailed film and holders get lost. I will likely mail or UPS the bulk of my film and the actual holders ahead of time to the motel and then mail them back. I would also mail the E6 stuff directly from Arizona to be processed.

    5. The major downside to the above plan is cost. If I figure 40 sheets a day of Quickloads, this will add up significantly specially on a 9 day trip. I may initally buy one box of quickloads a day and then order more from Freestyle overnighted to the motel once I have a better impression of my needs, but then Freesytle is not the cheapest specially with Acros and shipping costs will be significant.

    Thanks.

    Sincerely,

    Hany.
    Last edited by haziz; 02-26-2006 at 06:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    haziz's Avatar
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    One other advantage of quickloads and readyloads is the ability to write directly on the sheet/envelope. This significantly eases the ability to do N, N+1 and N-1 development. With FP4+ I have done only N development since I have been very reluctant to come up with a system for keeping track of individual sheets, though I realize that many do just that and transfer them at night to separate boxes. I still need to come up with my own N-1 and N+1 times though I have experimented with times published online and can also attempt to extrapolate from my N times.

    Thanks.

    Sincerely,

    Hany.

  4. #14
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Hany, have to agree with a few of the above posts. It sounds as if you may be putting the cart before the horse. Take one format (4x5) for LF and a second for quick shots. Use the FP4 and work out your numbers before you leave, there's plenty of time left. There is noting to doing n- and n+ with FP4, it has a nice range of values it can see. I don't see how you can take 40 shots a day and not know what the numbers are for plus and minus development. One reason we use sheet film is its ability to deal with contrast in differing scenes. Get out there and shoot in flat light and find a good number to expand development. Then, find some harsh contrast and do the same. You will find that light in the southwest is even but there is more contrast than you normally deal with in the east.

    I would think that to simplify would be your best bet here. The southwest is a wonderful area to shoot in, but light on a sunny day is pretty stable (the time of year you are traveling in won't have too many clouds, if any at all). Figure an sbr of 9 2/3 and you will have most shooting situations resolved. The words about a yellow and green filter are good ones. Perhaps a polarizer and 81b for color would be best as light here can be on the cool side due to blue skies.

    Simplify things to one film and one developer. Learn what FP4 can do, it has wonderful properties. Don't be a slave to your equipment on vacation, have fun! tim

  5. #15

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    Hany do you have enough available time to drive to the southwest instead of flying? Is this a photo expedition or a vacation? I say this because at this point in my life I rarely ever fly to shoot in North America but have found it preferable to drive. Driving enables me to use my own vehicle, bring as much film and gear, (as well as food, because food on long road trips can be unhealthy), and clothing geared to whatever weather I may come across and just about anything else I may need.

    It could take 3-4 days each way to drive from New England to the South west, but then again you may also come across interesting places to shoot along the way especially if you plan to drive through areas that have potential. Flying is still going to kill a day on each end, and you may still have a long drive from the airport to where you want to shoot so you may kill 2 days on each end. Also bags may get lost, deliveries get lost or arrive late, it's just safer in some ways to carry it all with you. What I do, and this is more risky in the summer due to all the vacationers, is I don't even book accommodations, unless it's to a very popular spot. I am free to spend as many or as few days as I want in any place and I am free to move to any place I choose. If the weather turns out to be undesireable, I may drive 500 miles to some other location where the weather and possibilities are better. I find this a very productive way to work.

  6. #16

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    You obviously do not mind carrying the equipment so I say go for it. I have not used acros but have used T-Max in the locations you are planning. You are going to need expansion capabilities and T-Max does that well.

    Just a warning though. The parking areas at Canyon De Chelly are notorious for break ins. Keep the cameras in the trunk. Just covering them in the backseat is an invitation. Carry a cooler for your extra film and keep all regular film holders in big zip locks.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  7. #17
    haziz's Avatar
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    I am leaning towards sticking with 4x5 and skipping 5x7 on this trip. Will likely stick to Quickloads/Readyloads. I still want to take my Canham camera (4x5/5x7 Woodfield) and now have to figure out a bag that qualifies as carry-on and that is oriented towards LF. I have a Lowepro backpack that will do the trick but it weighs a ton. My Fine Art Photo Supply 5x7 bag probably defies any airline's idea of carry-on luggage and the Canham won't fit a traditional 4x5 bag such as the Zone VI 4x5 bag.

    Thanks.

    Sincerely,

    Hany.

  8. #18
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Use the film with which you are familiar and comfortable. The only advantage T-Max has is that it is less sensitive to blue therefore rendering better skies without a filter. I like Acros, as well as FP4+, but if I were not homed in tightly on exposure and development I would not carry it on a trip.
    As for dust, I spend a lot of time in DV and the Anza Borrego desert. My holders are always in zip lock bags except when in the camera or being loaded or unloaded. I have rarely hada problem with dust. Be sure to vacuum insode your bellows prior to leaving home,this is the most common source of dust problems.

  9. #19
    haziz's Avatar
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    Leaning towards Fuji Acros

    I am leaning towards 4x5 quickloads using Acros, sticking to 4x5 only with just the Mamiya 7 as backup. I may even just take a Toyo AII instead of the Canham since it is slightly smoother and marginally more compact though by doing that I sacrifice the use of the Fujinon 450 mm lens due to lack of bellows draw and more fussy use of a wide-angle such as the 75 mm Grandagon (need to drop the bed). The Toyo would also force me to carry a Linhof to Toyo adapter board (I had shifted recently to Technica boards) or to remounting my lenses back on Toyo boards which are somewhat bulkier; not an issue with the lenses per-se but definitely occupying bigger slots/compartments in the camera bag. I am actively shooting the Acros now so that I have even more exposure to it before the trip. I am getting good results with it rated at 80-100 EI and developed in Rodinal 1:50.

    Sincerely

    Hany.

  10. #20

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    Acros and rodinal are a great looking combo.
    enjoy your trip!
    art is about managing compromise

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