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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    A further update:

    I processed two separate rolls (at two separate times) today. They were both J & C Classic Pan 200, shot at EI 125 (the film I use for trials and experiments).

    I used HC110 dil H @ 68 degrees F for 13 minutes., and agitated 5 seconds for each 30 seconds for the first minute, and the 5 seconds for each three minutes thereafter.

    Development appears even. For the first roll, I actually ran it through the enlarger in my not yet functioning bathroom/darkroom, and to my eye there were no signs of uneven development.

    The aprons are very tightly curled- much more tightly curled than my old Kodak aprons. This makes "loading" the film slightly more difficult, and may make stand development more unpredictable (tests would have to be made).

    The aprons are also slightly narrower than the Kodak aprons - I am not sure if I could use the Kodak aprons in the Freestyle tank, because there may not be enough clearance (there is definitely some), to allow the chemistry to flow easily over the top of the apron.

    I use the aprons, because I can do every step necessary with respect to the stainless reels except the initial clipping of the end to the core - I have great fine dexterity and motor skills in my left hand, but limited dexterity and range of motion in my right. The 35mm reels work fine for me - the film is inherently stiffer when loading, and I can therefore just insert it in the gap and crimp it. The 120 reels, however, require that you use one hand to work the clip, while the other feeds the film. My right hand just isn't up to those two types of motions.

    By the way, the Freestyle tanks are absolutely void of labels or markings, save and except for 4 characters which I expect are chinese in origin. I have no idea what they mean.

    Now if I can just figure a way to use the aprons easily with my film drier..

    Matt

  2. #12
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Like so many things in photography today, folks simply look for an easier way to do everything. Loading a Nikor spiral reel is very simple, quick and easy to do, you will never have an apron stuck to your prize winning negative and you will be doing it the tradishional way the pro's have done it for years. I can imagine Joseph Karsh putting the role of film he just completed of Winston Churchill in a plastic tank and using an apron. :-)

    I truly feel sorry for anyone who can't or won't master loading a spiral film reel the second or third time he/she tries. All this is a matter of opinion of course and I reserve the right to mine.

    Kodak designed the film apron for beginners learning to develop film, I cannot understand accomplished "Artist's" that refuse to learn the simple act that amatuers and other photographers have known how to do and done for years.

    Let the flames begin!

    Charlie...........................

  3. #13
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Webb
    Like so many things in photography today, folks simply look for an easier way to do everything. Loading a Nikor spiral reel is very simple, quick and easy to do, you will never have an apron stuck to your prize winning negative and you will be doing it the tradishional way the pro's have done it for years. I can imagine Joseph Karsh putting the role of film he just completed of Winston Churchill in a plastic tank and using an apron. :-)

    I truly feel sorry for anyone who can't or won't master loading a spiral film reel the second or third time he/she tries. All this is a matter of opinion of course and I reserve the right to mine.

    Kodak designed the film apron for beginners learning to develop film, I cannot understand accomplished "Artist's" that refuse to learn the simple act that amatuers and other photographers have known how to do and done for years.

    Let the flames begin!

    Charlie...........................
    Well, some people find one thing easy, and others find a different thing easy. One ought to think twice before poking fun at someone else's disabilities. For example, I would never mention that there are two k's in Nikkor, that commas are not used to join independent clauses, that there is no "sh" in "traditional," that film does not come in "roles," that the apostrophe is not used to form the plural of "artist," and that English speakers over the age of 12 ought to know the correct spelling of "amateur." The reason that I am not saying any of those things, and will never do so, is that it would be grossly unfair, since some people are clearly unable to write their own mother tongue or to use the SpellCheck button. I think that those of us who are challenged in the area of loading stainless steel reels are entitled to the same forbearance as I have just displayed.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Webb
    Like so many things in photography today, folks simply look for an easier way to do everything. Loading a Nikor spiral reel is very simple, quick and easy to do, you will never have an apron stuck to your prize winning negative and you will be doing it the tradishional way the pro's have done it for years. I can imagine Joseph Karsh putting the role of film he just completed of Winston Churchill in a plastic tank and using an apron. :-)

    I truly feel sorry for anyone who can't or won't master loading a spiral film reel the second or third time he/she tries. All this is a matter of opinion of course and I reserve the right to mine.

    Kodak designed the film apron for beginners learning to develop film, I cannot understand accomplished "Artist's" that refuse to learn the simple act that amatuers and other photographers have known how to do and done for years.

    Let the flames begin!

    Charlie...........................
    Charlie:

    I'll challenge you to a steel reel loading contest, but there is one special rule. Each of us will have to wear a boxing glove on our right hand!

    That's a crude approximation of how my right hand is affected.

    I expect that you didn't read the details in my earlier post, or you wouldn't have made quite the same post you made.

    I have been adapting to my realities for my entire life, including over 40 years of photography, and I have figured out how to deal with a lot of challenges, but there are just some things that I cannot reliably and consistently do. One of those challenges that remains unsolved (to date) is how to load 120 stainless steel reels (Nikor, no name brand, Kindermann or Hewes) without too high an incidence of film damage.

    35mm on steel reels works great, because you don't need a clip at the core. I've loaded hundreds or thousands of rolls. 120 requires some sort of clip, and I cannot operate them.

    From reading some of your posts, I know that you too have had to deal with some challenges recently. I applaud your courage and determination.

    You asked for a flame ...

    Matt

  5. #15
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazzy
    For example, I would never mention that there are two k's in Nikkor...
    Nikkor: Nikon Lenses
    Nikor: Stainless Steel tanks

    Don't ask me why they sound the same, but they're totally different things.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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