Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,862   Posts: 1,583,180   Online: 718
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Chorley, Lancashire, England
    Posts
    129
    Many thanks for all comments.
    I'll revert to 400 ISO and use trial and try to establish a personal best time.
    Cheers
    Jeff

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    7,150
    Quote Originally Posted by chorleyjeff
    Many thanks for all comments.
    I'll revert to 400 ISO and use trial and try to establish a personal best time.
    Cheers
    Jeff
    Jeff. Have a look at the Ilford dev times again. I tried to do this on the Ilford Harman site but could only find times for stock solution. However on the older(by 2yrs) Ilford Products site it says that 11.5 mins for 1+1 is for 24degrees C. The time for 20 degrees C is 14 mins.

    So at 20 degrees C you were underdeveloping by 2.5 mins which as a percentage of 14 is substantial enough to give you thin negs.

    As someone else said, Roger Hicks made the point about the manufacturer's times being well tested and worth trusting until you are in a position to try for a personal film speed.

    I am not recommending that you don't do a test for personal film speed but maybe another try at Ilford's time of 14 mins might be worthwhile.

    Dave Miller made good point about different agitation methods. If you follow Ilford's time then stick to Ilford's agitation of four inversions in the first 10 secs and then the same 4 inversions for 10 secs at each minute interval thereafter.

    Pentaxuser

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Burley, New Forest
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    On a recent workshop with Les Mclean we shared the film developing routine for three sections of film that had been exposed for speed testing. Les with one drum whilst I had another. Each drum contained the same type of film, in the same developer, and we filled and emptied in unison. Whilst my inversion routine is a gentle, affair, Les has adopted the style of a cocktail waiter, with each inversion accompanied by a vigorous shaking. The result was about a one stop difference in density between the films in his drum to those in mine. It demonstrated that all elements of the film development routine are important, and why the development time may need to vary between one person and another.
    Is that the 3 day workshop featured in the current Black & White Photography magazine? I've got Les' book and when I feel more comfortable with developing per the instructions I will do the film speed tests. I'd be interested to know what you decided on for your 'personal film speed' and development time.

    Kevin

  4. #14
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by kdanks
    Is that the 3 day workshop featured in the current Black & White Photography magazine? I've got Les' book and when I feel more comfortable with developing per the instructions I will do the film speed tests. I'd be interested to know what you decided on for your 'personal film speed' and development time.

    Kevin
    Yes it is.
    Personal film speed is surely that, something that suits your individual style. The point I was making here is the considerable effect that the inversion method makes on the films development; nothing wrong with either approach, as long as it is consistent. It’s also another reason for doing you own testing to find a rating that you are happy with. There is also the problem of scene contrast range to factor into the equation at some stage.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  5. #15
    Matt5791's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    England, Birmingham
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    998
    Images
    17
    This is an interesting discussion for me because I keep thinking about shooting tests.

    I have read the tests Ansel Adams suggests in "The Negative" and I guess this is probably a good place to start?

    The only problem I have is that my film exposures are often made quickly and under pressure with little time for lots of meter readings which means often a quick incident reading if using the Hasselblad or relying on the internal meter with the Nikon FE2. Obviously I don't blindly follow those readings but try to interpret them intelligently.

    The thing that occured to me with regard to the processing is I just need a happy medium because of the often variable exposures so I have been just following the manufacturers recommendation times and using a consistant agitation with each procesing.

    Is this the right thing to do?

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt5791
    This is an interesting discussion for me because I keep thinking about shooting tests.

    I have read the tests Ansel Adams suggests in "The Negative" and I guess this is probably a good place to start?

    The only problem I have is that my film exposures are often made quickly and under pressure with little time for lots of meter readings which means often a quick incident reading if using the Hasselblad or relying on the internal meter with the Nikon FE2. Obviously I don't blindly follow those readings but try to interpret them intelligently.

    The thing that occured to me with regard to the processing is I just need a happy medium because of the often variable exposures so I have been just following the manufacturers recommendation times and using a consistant agitation with each procesing.

    Is this the right thing to do?
    Yes, that's the right way to start. Testing and densitometry is a common way of gaining additional film/developer behavior information that will help you learn to deal with exposure variables.

    Many large format photographers also Develop By Inspection for better control of the developing process.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Plymouth. UK.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,403
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by chorleyjeff
    The Ilford web site and the ID11 package info. is 14 minutes at 20c for the above film/dev combination but an Ilford wall chart I have says 11.5 minutes.
    I guess the web site is the best info. BUT I had assumed the wall chart was right so I used it without checking the other sources of information. I found that 11.5 minutes gave thin negatives so reduced film speed to 200 ISO and it seemed to work OK. So I'm a bit confused. Should I be pragmatic and rely on experimentation or can anyone advise whether I should increase film speed and increase development time ( 400 ISO and 14 minutes) or should I go to basics and try several different film speeds with different development times? Any advice gratefully received.
    Thanks
    Jeff
    PS I print on Ilford multigrade in MG dev.using a meopta colourhead.
    The development time of 14 minutes is correct for the current version of Delta 400 (3rd generation). The time of 11.5 minutes on your wall chart, is for the previous version.
    http://www.ilford.com/html/us_english/pdf/Delta400.pdf
    Last edited by Keith Tapscott.; 03-07-2006 at 03:13 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I forgot to add a link.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Chorley, Lancashire, England
    Posts
    129
    Thanks for pointing out that Delta 400 improvements have altered recommended development times. I should have realised this for myself.
    Cheers
    Jeff

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin