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Thread: TMY at 1600?

  1. #21
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janvanhove
    ok, i'll bite: why not use simply kodak t-max developper? I know it's not on your list of chemicals you use, but it's the best I've used for push processing of both kodak t-max films (T-max 3200 at 12800 anyone??) and even ilford HP5 (up to 3200)...

    Cheers,

    PJ
    Because I don't want to buy yet another developer when I have three perfectly good ones right here. Rodinal is GREAT for pushing Tri-X (IMHO) and so I just wanted to see what pushing TMY would be like.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnashings
    Perhaps someone remembers this discussion - I can't find the link to the thread - but there was some excellent examples of how far you can push with Rodinal in a Rangefinder Forums thread. Granted, the film was TriX - probably the most flexible medium out there - but overall results of these pushes were a revelation. And I am talking about 12800 for example. It would seem that with the semi-stand method that you are thinking of using, you should be able to get surprising results!
    Hopefully someone can remember the discussion or perhaps was involved in it - it seems that the gentleman who did these experiments may be a good resource for people wanting to push with Rodinal. I just wish I could have been more help with specifics,

    Peter.
    Peter,

    I too was intrigued by that thread and especially by the results that the author posted and claimed. Unfortunately, in my own testing - which was rather thorough, it seems the information in the rangefinderforum thread may have been embelished just a touch.

    check this out for the specifics:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/26813-portraiture-pushing-tri-x-txp-320-rodinal-limits.html


    Cheers
    Daniel

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    It really does amazing things developing TMY, but it's been raining frogs ever since I've started to use it.
    Well, it IS Passover.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by janvanhove
    ok, i'll bite: why not use simply kodak t-max developper? I know it's not on your list of chemicals you use, but it's the best I've used for push processing of both kodak t-max films (T-max 3200 at 12800 anyone??) and even ilford HP5 (up to 3200)...

    Cheers,

    PJ
    I notice this too. Seems like the curious people here are bored with straightforward combinations and anything with "Kodak" in it.

    I was very disappointed with myself when I did a blind testing of various printing papers and found that I liked the look of Polymax the best. Surely my tastes are more esoteric than that. In the end I settled on TMAX 100 in TMAX RS developer on Polymax (Zone VI developer though). Wish I had time to test more options too.
    Jerold Harter MD

  5. #25
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Wonderful weather in Detroit this weekend.

    Thinking about Sunday dinner, and hankering for something nice in the way of tomatoes

    Went straight to the receipe box, the treasury of secrets of great cooks I've met from all over. EVERY fantastic receipe for a marinated tomato, however wonderful the variation of the sauce, echoed my Mom's Ozark farm-girl's advice,

    "Start with a good tomato."

    The exact same wisdom informs all possibilities of film development: start with a good picture.

    And since there won't be a good tomato around here for months,
    I think I'll go with Grandma's wilted lettuce instead.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

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