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  1. #11
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera
    Hangers for anything take a little bit of learning curve. I tried using hangers for normal development, but I got developer surge on my film from the vent holes in the hanger frames. This may not be a problem with EMA/semi-stand, but the downside to hangers is the extreme volume of chemistry you have to mix up relative to the number of sheets you can process.
    Hangers are really a cinch and very suitable to semi-stand development.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  2. #12
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    It can be done. But the problem is that the films tend to either float to the surface so the emulsion dries out (emulsion side up), or sink to the bottom and stick to the bottom of the tray (emulsion side down).

    With glass plate negatives it's easy!
    For solarizing litho or Tech Pan negatives where a little bit of stand development is needed, I use a cut-down film hanger to keep the film submerged face up. The film is backed with a sheet of fully exposed and developed film to block reflections from the hanger.

  3. #13
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I have been using stand development for special projects since the 40's.
    A typical example of my use is when photographing flat scenes under heavily clouded skies and the need for expansion is great. Utilizing well used D-23 in trays I agitate for 30-45 seconds, cover with another tray and do other things. After about an hour I agitate for about 15 seconds, inspect the negative from the base side, and cover it once again. This typically goes on for about 3 hours, but i have let the film stand overnight. The amount of expansion is truly great, often as much as 4-5 stops in the highlights.

    I learned this during my first job in photography. The last thing we did each evening was load all of the roll film, regardless of maker, onto a large rack with 2 oz lead weights at the bottom of the film. The film was lowered into the huge D-23 bath, which I never remember changing, lifted up and down a few times, the top cover placed on it and left until we arrived the next morning to complete the processing and print all of the negatives.

    This is true total development, and the silver in the well used developer re-plated the highlights to get them to their maximum density. All negatives were printable unless the film was so severely underexpsed that there was little or no information on the film.

    The only film I ave never developed with this technigue are the T-Max and similar ones.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #14
    gainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce (Camclicker)
    That's the best, most ingenious idea I've seen come out of APUG in 4 years. My hat's off to you Gadget.
    Glad to be of help. This is unusual. Some simply think I'm perverted.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #15
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel
    I have been using stand development for special projects since the 40's.
    A typical example of my use is when photographing flat scenes under heavily clouded skies and the need for expansion is great. Utilizing well used D-23 in trays I agitate for 30-45 seconds, cover with another tray and do other things. After about an hour I agitate for about 15 seconds, inspect the negative from the base side, and cover it once again. This typically goes on for about 3 hours, but i have let the film stand overnight. The amount of expansion is truly great, often as much as 4-5 stops in the highlights.

    I learned this during my first job in photography. The last thing we did each evening was load all of the roll film, regardless of maker, onto a large rack with 2 oz lead weights at the bottom of the film. The film was lowered into the huge D-23 bath, which I never remember changing, lifted up and down a few times, the top cover placed on it and left until we arrived the next morning to complete the processing and print all of the negatives.

    This is true total development, and the silver in the well used developer re-plated the highlights to get them to their maximum density. All negatives were printable unless the film was so severely underexpsed that there was little or no information on the film.

    The only film I ave never developed with this technigue are the T-Max and similar ones.
    Jim, this reminds me of Oliver Gagliani. What film are you using? Do you imagine that there is a one shot film developer that would work for those of us that don't have used D23. I threw mine out (20 years ago). Thanks.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  6. #16
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Pyrocat-hd

  7. #17

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    I bit the bullet and processed my 11x14 negs in trays using semi stand agitating with a brush. I used my NVGs to ensure the sheets stayed submersed, which they did the whole processing time with out assistance. Of course I cheated and observe the development at the end of the processing time with the NVGs as well.

    Long story short, semi stand works in trays, with the materials, chemistry and process times that I was using.

  8. #18

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    Mike, what does NVGs stand for?

  9. #19

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    night vision goggles.

    G

  10. #20

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    Thanks, argus.

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